Measuring Prayer—A Model in Physics

Outcomes of prayer—where are they now?

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In physics observable is defined as something that can be measured. The basic realities in life also can be measured. Outcomes can be predicted based on experience, consensus, repeatability, and yes, our eyes (usually). Only what a person can observe, measure, and demonstrate can be deemed as truth.

We all know the commutative law—take two numbers x and y. Multiply them and you can see that xy = yx. Always, no exception. But not so fast in quantum mechanics. If A and B are two matrices, then AB is not always equal to BA. Thus you cannot simultaneously determine the position and momentum of a particle. Both are incompatible (strange, but that’s how it is) and harnessing this discrepancy is leading to quantum computers, where you can watch it work even though it’s hard to understand how or why (even for physicists).

This is where religion steps in. Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle is foundational to matrix mechanics and where religion gets its primordial root in the prehistoric, basic operations of the quantum world. A sort of…subtle inheritance from our humble, elemental beginnings. Immeasurable, unverifiable, always changing positions of electrons doctrine, faith, and prayer. But now, not by defining particle behavior, but by splitting hairs.

Outcomes of prayer and faith cannot be predicted based on faith, experience, consensus, or dependability. Therefor, the attempts at faith and prayer is not truth. But, based on the known laws of quantum mechanics we can make a guess to where all those unanswered prayers wound up…waiting, somewhere between time, space, and subjectivity. Quantumly entangled with the prayers sender, but the missing, immeasurable electron (god) needed to complete the circuit has been uninterested, missing, hidden…forever.

Fundamental to understanding unanswered prayer, HERE is a fine new blog I stumbled across that illustrates the point, only better—Say hello to WOG

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

32 thoughts on “Measuring Prayer—A Model in Physics”

  1. Prayer does not work, ever. If it seems it did, that is a result of Chaos Theory: someone’s prayer results in a chance happening appearing to fulfill the request of the prayer. You can look at all the theories you want, but prayer has nothing to do with science. Prayer has nothing to do with reality on any level.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I was praying you’d show up today! Chance? Hah! Dependable? Yep! Provable? Absolutely. Unlike a real prayer though, I didn’t ask god to alter physics to spite his already perfect plan and forknowledge. Whew! Glad you didn’t take the day off.

      Like

      1. Lol. Almost did. But I heard a voice inside my head, “Comment on Jim’s post.” Of course, I had to decide which Jim, so out of a choice of 1 Jim that I follow, I chose you. How’s that for coincidence, totally proving how chaotic Chaos Theory can be.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Really cool! I like the idea of the wacky world of quantum physics! I always think, if a culture of people cantered around science were proselytized by missionaries like in many real-life cultures, they would see Christianity through a scientific lens! For example, the idea of the trinity could be like the triple point, the temperature and pressure at which water for instance, can exist in all 3 states at once! 😉
    https://aladyofreason.wordpress.com/

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    1. That’s always a nice try, the water thing. I think it was necessary to switch it to three because the one was just not enough tail chasing conjecture. If there was a god I would know there are many. Why? Because Christianity and Islam are always completely opposite of reality. This would prove no different.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Christians also do use that analogy too, but not like in science, where all 3 can exist simultaneously! I think it’s honestly a holdover from older paganism, and the other 2 Abrahamic faiths reject it as polytheism 😉

        Liked by 2 people

        1. I like to think of god as a chicken egg that went bad, and how people react to it. They think hey, eggs. After visual inspection they try crackin it open. If it’s not rotten already, it will be.

          Liked by 2 people

  3. “… but the missing, immeasurable electron (god) needed to complete the circuit has been uninterested, missing, hidden…forever.”

    This is really funny. Maybe the prayers are out there somewhere.

    Thanks, Jim.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. This reminds me of the chaos magicians of the early 90s. They were all about defined measurable results. And they didn’t care if there was a supernatural or psychological reason for success — only IF what they were doing lead to results.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. I saw that. I was wondering what year it was. Lol. Hey isn’t it amazing the advances that are still happening with Heisenberg’s 92 year old theory. As well as the general theory? Those were some smart ones they were!

          Liked by 2 people

  4. Moreover, The Uncertainty of Principle of Quantum Mechanics tells us that there is Uncertainty in measuring the position and momentum of a particle.

    This principle is one of the most fundamental ones…

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Quantum Mechanics and Theory of Relativity (the major theories by which most of the Physicists determine the universe), refresh our ideas about the universe.

    Relativity tells us that what one can observe or sense is the reality, and, there is no unique picture of reality. Every person has his/her own picture of reality

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That’s the inherent power of belief, but is it truth? When I was a believer I sort of held to the idea that we would each creare our own heaven based on what we thought it should be. The heavens of the big religions never appealed to me, especially the Christian and Islam versions.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. To me, the heavens of religions like Islam and Hinduism never appealed to me…

        Actually, you may know that Hinduism is actually an atheism philosophy. It is based on the VEDAS, which reject god etc. Vedas motivate us to find the hidden mysteries of the Universe.

        But, as time passed on, some authors started to wrote fictional novels (epics) which introduced the idea of God and multiple Gods. These were eventually started to believed by many of Hindus, and, the ideas passed on to next generations.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. If everyone devoted their religious time to finding the hidden mysteries of the universe, we’d struggle to keep up with the volumes of enlightenment. Thanks for the info on hinduism. Still a bit of a mystery here in the West.

          Liked by 1 person

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