How to Dismiss the Wrong Beliefs

What works better than geography to determine the one true faith? Familiarity

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With Islam overtaking Christianity through fertility rates, it must soon be the one True Faith© How can so many people have gotten it wrong, but in the process now of getting it right? The guard is changing because gods will is in control. The pendulum is finally swinging towards Mecca and there is no other explanation—except one.

Trading one wrong for another. It is belief itself that is the culprit—thought convictions so strong one would strike their own children because of them (or go to war with a neighbor) The way to know if your thought convictions are true is to apply the same criteria to your own faith as you do to others—and that they do to yours. Islam makes perfect sense…to a Muslim, while they shake their heads at the ridiculous Christians that have been duped beyond reason.

The truth is…there is no Abrahamic truth—there is only settlements of faith based on geographically bred familiarity.

Faith—dividing nations from within one believer at a time through the pulpits of propaganda and fear. It’s so obvious an atheist can see it. And that’s exactly the point.

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

49 thoughts on “How to Dismiss the Wrong Beliefs”

    1. Believe is a transitory state to prove a premise. Not an end in itself. So no, I don’t “believe” in science but there are certain properties we don’t fully understand that we manipulate to usefulness. Those pieces that prove improbable lose favor. I’m flexible. Does that help, or what do you have in mind?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Good! I agree with you. This is the right attitude.

        Many people when they reject religion fall in the trap of filling the place vacated by religion by filling it with science and that is wrong. The fundamental problem is “belief”, the unwillingness to stand on your own feet and be free from all “beliefs” – secular or religious.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I do think is this life were actually a test it would be to see if we can transcend belief mode and it’s divisive properties. Merely thought convictions without evidence, but years of evidence that it has not met its objectives. The Bible tells us the natural man is an enemy to god and to shun pride. The reality is the natural man is the believing man—everybody holds a belief, even at the expense of another. Faith is then lauded as a virtue, but is merely manifesting the ultimate display of stubborn pride in an idea that holds no substance or evidence. It’s quite an inventive trick to play on the foibles of human psychology.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Hello Jim. There is a video on the subject you are talking about. I don’t know how to share it with you other than posting the link here. If you don’t want it here please delete it. Hugs

            Liked by 1 person

          2. ” if we can transcend belief mode”

            jim, transcending the belief mode was what I am talking about. It is being intellectually and spiritually free. For this one should be in inquiring, learning and critically thinking mode.

            I like the phrase ‘transcend belief mode’.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. We also have to transcend the limitations of faith. We’ve been dealt a mediocre hand and convinced to bet the house on it. There are better options

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  1. Christianity and Islam are variants of one religious system. The more one knows about both of them the more obvious this becomes. The differences are relatively minor, though both sides of the Christian-Muslim argument will try to deny that. This is partly because both derive from Judaism, and also because both absorbed influences from classical philosophy and Persian thought. And you know, there are still billions of people outside of Abrahamism. They don’t have everyone.

    I have seen atheists that are strangely unconcerned about Islam, though they bash Christianity all the time. Atheists will be the first on the chopping block if Islam gains more power.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I know your right about that. I’ve posted a couple of times about Islam but don’t really have the depth, except viewing the outcomes like I do Christianity.
      I see a Muslim blog on here once in a while whose premise is; when atheists and Christians argue, we win! Maybe so, but it blows my mind that people still join it by choice. I did look t the steps to join out of curiosity, and it’s super easy. The way they present it it’s all peace and tolerance, but we know better by looking at majority Muslim counties. Imagine what it will be like when they run a world theocracy?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Something else to reflect on. That great edifice of medieval Scholastic theology relied heavily on Aristotle(transmitted through Muslims and translated to Latin) and Arabic commentaries on Greek philosophy written by Muslims like Avicenna. Sometimes reading a Muslim theologian is like reading a Christian writer, this is part of the reason. There was also a strand of mystical thought in Islam that resembles the hermetic and platonizing forms of Christianity from the Renaissance. A lot of that was further influenced by Jewish Kabbalah, there was even a sect of medieval Islam that had its own Kabbalistic system along with ideals that today look like a combination of theocracy and socialism. There was a lot more exchange between Christianity than Islam than either side liked to admit.

        Look at just about any topic that Westerners(often trying to argue for Christianity as being more favorable) find objectionable about Islam today, and you will find that traditional Christianity did it up until recent times. Killing of apostates and blasphemers, Christians did that all the time, you saw that example from before the French Revolution. Christianity was never tolerant of other Christian sects or any other religion. Thomas Aquinas was all for the execution of heretics, and Augustine argued for torture and forced conversions. Sharia law, fatwas, and theocratic tendencies? Christianity had versions of all of those things. What do people nowadays think that all that fuss was made about Canon Law for? Bishops and Popes issued excommunications and condemnations all the time. They also had the temporal power to have people mutilated or killed for various offences. The attitude toward women was similar to Islam, though somewhat tempered by European culture. You don’t have to read much into older Christian literature to see the contempt and even pathological fear of women. Women had no more right to get out of a marriage in Christianity than in Islam, and beating one’s wife was acceptable. Adultery was a capital offense. Even the favored dress code and obsession with sex is similar between Christianity and Islam. As for attitudes toward things like rape, it was not that big of a deal. Masturbation and sodomy were far more serious sins than rape according to the Christian authorities. In the law, the Old Testament decree that a rape victim must marry the rapist was upheld.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Maybe Islam will evolve to be a little softer too? I think matching up Islam to Christianity about 500 years ago they’re on the approximate evolutionary timeline. Thanks for your insights as always, K. Much appreciated. If it weren’t for secular laws I would venture a guess Christianity would be a lot harder to differentiate from Islam even today.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. So, Christians in general fear being numerically replaced by Muslims; and, white Christians in particular fear being numerically replaced by brown and black peoples. Fear is the key word here. Why are they so afraid? Because they can’t or won’t see the humanity of anyone who isn’t exactly like them. It’s a disgustingly vile attitude which contradicts the supposed teachings of their own worshiped messiah… Jesus.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. They are all lost. Only I am right. At least half of all atheists are wrong. Those who claim agnostic don’t know crap (and admit it). But, I could be wrong about that. I shall brood and ponder such things, but later.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hello Jim. I like your idea of examining your own positions to see if they are correct as strongly as you do others. As I am often into controversial subjects more than religion I find I have to do that occasionally to make sure I do not go off the rails and over the cliff. But I have never found a religious person who would be critical of their faith unless they were de-converting. I recounted the story of a woman who recently kept telling me she KNEW god was real, she KNEW her prayers were answered, she KNEW… and couldn’t even consider she did not have any real proof other than her feelings. Hugs

    Liked by 3 people

    1. What may be even stranger, is when examination does occur they come to a crossroads of decision, and more often than not they will sacrifice their integrity for the herd, family, friends and work.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. “more often than not they will sacrifice their integrity for the herd, family, friends and work. ”

        You are right about this jim. This is why humans can not think honestly. Often people who think honestly have to pay a heavy price for their honesty. An animal who separates from the herd becomes an easy prey to predators and so his genes become extinct.

        In present times as there is a large minority of atheists, being an atheist is no big deal so there is no big social problem about it.

        Your thoughts about it?

        Liked by 1 person

  5. truth needs to be experienced on one’s own skin. then, everything will makes sense. until then, there will always be delusion, confusion and questions arising. the game depends on that. have a godless, blissful day😁🌞

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am beginning to believe the only truth as we are speaking of is only found in the exact moment of experience. Rarely transferable and often completely individual. The big religious experience, the revival and the prepared dogmas have too much influence, produce a quasi, mediocre experience we are told is the epitome of human experience, but is really a cheap imitation of what one is capable of on their own. Hijacked, hedged, packaged and sold as a gem, but is really a turd that has stalled the human experience.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. yes, absolutely it is found in the exact moment of experience. i don’t know about the religious versions, but i know for certain that all who have experienced it (including buddha, jesus and all others) have found such an experience of oneness with all there is, that cannot be translated into words. it leaves one completely transformed, and the sense of separate individual is erased. some are lucky to remain there all the time, but most often one has to integrate that with day to day living. it is the realization that nothing exists outside you. this realization doesn’t need any belief or dogma. it is merely a matter of paying attention. you understand very well.😊

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’ve been thinking..hehe. Usually I awake in the morning with these thoughts. I really don’t think this way normally so I’m not sure where it comes from but the initial curiosity. I have pretty good luck putting my brain to work before bedtime. Thanks Monica. I still have been to busy to really try this out, but I’ll get there

          Liked by 1 person

    1. Yikes. Some of em will swim out of it eventually, but even when they do they’ll still think in Christian off and on the rest of their life. Pretty sure the pastor already suspects it’s nonsense.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Not likely. My granddaughter married him, & they moved to Winnipeg last October after he graduated & got his own church there. She’s the one who had the baby boy last August….our first g.g.child. His pastor father performed their wedding4 years ago, & we have NEVER seen anything like it in any other wedding we’d attended….religious or otherwise. We were contemplating walking out if it wouldn’t have embarrassed our daughter, & granddaughter.

        Liked by 3 people

          1. We’re not close so its no big deal for us. When our daughter married the fanatic, that put a wall up, so they, & their kids were not really into we atheists. We get along, but at a distance. Now with their kids grown up, pretty much & the eldest married, we barely know them. They live in West Kelowna.
            The church is the alliance church, as far as I know, but no idea which nonsense it all is. The pastor dad has a huge church in Calgary Alberta.

            Liked by 3 people

            1. Its all rather frightening.
              Our g.daughter’s wedding was all about gawd, jeezzuzz, & her being brought to jeezzuz, & more gawd. There was nothing about love, & the two of them or their life together…..nothing. We did hear the part about babies, & they’d better start coming soon….& pastor daddy met our granddaughter before his son did, & he wanted her for his son…..as if she was a piece of merchandise.
              We did eventually walk out of the reception after the meal was finished as it was just as bad as the ceremony with gawd/jeezzuz speeches. We thought receptions were supposed to be the fun part….our bad.

              Liked by 2 people

  6. In the mall yesterday and a cult family walked into the food hall. It was frightening to see, but I couldn’t help but feel terrible for the kids. There were six or seven, all dressed in their puritan clothes, hair braided, fear and confusion in their eyes. It’s abuse, plain and simple.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. On the plus side, people that openly identify as non-religious is also at an all time high. Off a smaller base, so the growth is theoretically more impressive.

    Starts singing Life of Brians ‘Always look on the bright side of life’…

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Well, after the comment I did a full tarot reading (these things take time) then I got sidetracked with some MMA recaps. After reading your cards I also realized anything I might say would inadvertently alter the collision course with destiny that set in motion when you hit send. I did do a crystal cleansing on your behalf (should be fine now) and burned some sage. After the cleansing, I got this black cat that walked under my ladder while I was carrying a mirror and I literally hid in the shower for two hours. But hey, thanks for the comment! I barely made it out alive!

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Thanks… you see! Was that so hard? You know I’m sensitive.

          Been dealing with a lot of rejection lately. And this clearly wasn’t helping!!!

          We’re all good now though. You have made amends.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. It’s astonishing what you DON’T see when you’re indoctrinated in a faith. It seems so simple and plain and clear once you’ve stepped outside of it. Call it the Fog of Faith, I guess. I was blinded by it myself for years. Thankfully, the sun (the actual Sun) is shining now!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. The explainers keep you second guessing yourself (and they exist because of their own need for validation) Doubt is then masterfully hedged as a test of faith, and who wants to fail a test?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Give me your soul now for a chance to get it back later…maybe. But no question the deal manifests itself now. And then hope for the best, but like the priests of Baal, there’s not much of a guarantee.

        Liked by 2 people

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