History of the World in Human Time

How to see things in geologic time.

Most people have no idea how young humans are. We are infants. “If January 1st 2019 were the beginning of earth, and December 31st the current day, each day would represent about 12million years (for a 4.3billion years-old earth)

—Bacterium would have formed February 1st and fish November 20th.

—Dinosaurs came into the field December 10th, then our first hominid ancestors on December 31st (in the afternoon), with Homo sapiens coming on the scene at about 11:45 PM. The past 1 minute being the period of known history“—New World Mind, Robert Ornstein and Paul Ehlich

—That’s the history of the world compressed into one year for perspective—But 70billion light years ago Yahweh was tinkering with a human genome to get his Adam, laying the groundwork to have lights in the heavens his man could never see.

The real trick is going to see if we can make it til 12:01… We have advanced for economics sake faster than our evolution, and faster that our rememberable history. What we need now are minds that can perceive and plan for long term, slow motion, earthtime processes, or we may just find the greatest threat to ever face the planet is the prolific homo-sapien, created in the image of god.

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

28 thoughts on “History of the World in Human Time”

  1. We are our own worst enemy. No doubt this planet will find a way to rid itself of the plague of humanity, hopefully so it can continue on without us. I can’t find any complaint in that. I almost welcome it… What we have done through pure greed, insolence, and lack of empathy, condemns us to our fate.

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    1. The funny thing is, if you take out the greed and economic urgency to keep making excess crap for profit, we could take the time to find the most efficient ways of living that are in harmony with nature. But as it stands, they all give themselves the right to pollute my breathing space so they can make a buck.

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  2. Yep. And after we die, we shall live on forever, which is almost as long. I have read that virtually all life on Earth has gone extinct (99.9% or some such nearly all estimate). Yet, we believe we will not. The weather or environmental destruction of the livability of the planet may do the job slowly.
    But when we decide to use the nucs; Hurry Sundown—over in a literal flash.
    Armageddon: exactly what too many want.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. All good except that last part, but I presume you were being ironic. Most gods have been made in man’s image. I’m more partial to sun gods and the like, though. When Sunny is through, so are we!

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      1. The knee is progressing on schedule, but it’s been 7 weeks of hell to get here. I probably won’t post for some time yet – I want to get this next draft of the book done. I miss it, though. I haven’t been able to think straight to write anything.

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  4. I use this same argument in asking people to consider that modern science has been around for about 400 years, while religions and philosophy have been around for many thousands of years. Why do we expect science to have solved all the things religion and philosophy could not in just a few centuries? Give us some time, people.

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  5. That really puts things in perspective, doesn’t it? I’m an amateur astronomer so I’m used to throwing around numbers with a lot of ‘billions’ in them, so perhaps I’ve become a bit jaded when it comes to time. The solar system has been around for about 4.7 billion, the universe for about 13.3 (or so) billion years. Earth for about 4 billion. While creatures who are recognizably modern humans, people like us, have only been around for about 100,000.

    On top of that we’re rather fragile creatures. We can’t tolerate temperatures outside of a very narrow range without resorting to artificial means. We don’t swim very well, we suffer from a wide range of disease. The entire species was nearly wiped out more than once. And as if natural causes weren’t bad enough, we have this habit of trying to kill ourselves off with wars about the most ridiculous reasons.

    Frankly, it’s amazing we’ve lasted this long.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It’s true. Ideas have extended lives and poisoned the pool, preserving nearly all the mutations unworthy of survival, through medicine and surgery. The idea that everything should survive will one day mean none of us will.

      Liked by 3 people

        1. We allow nothing natural to occur. Humanity’s biggest problem may be the fact that we like to fix things. It will bite us. Reminds me of “On The Problem of Good”, speaking of good books.

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  6. Depends on how bad things are with the environment. A lot of people deny that there is any problem, some are starting to worry, a few are worried and trying to do something, and a small number are shouting irrevocable doom. What do you rate the chance at making it past midnight?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have no idea K. I’m an eternal optimist, so I’ll be ok. Haha. Well, that’s a good question. I’m not really experted on climate prediction, but I think humans will survive (even in most horrible, or primitive conditions) to rise again and start over, only to burned at the second coming.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. But, if those survivors are believers…here we go again with another special people giving credit to god for those lives saved, even though billions died. What an ego trip that would be

        Liked by 1 person

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