Adam—the First of His Kind

In the beginning was the word, the sound, the vibration, the big bang, the primordial om, the name that cannot be named.

Imagine being aroused from a deep sleep only to be hypnotized… “22 And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: In other words, man has been instructed to see the world in duality, that he and his actions are separate from his environment, which is not the natural state…of anything, and certainly not as “one of us” when a god, by every reasonable definition can be only non-dual.

19 And out of the ground the LORD God formed every beast of the field, and every fowl of the air; and brought them unto Adam to see what he would call them: and whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof. 20 And Adam gave names to all cattle, and to the fowl of the air, and to every beast of the field;

This was the fall of man—the rapid decent into a fixed, measured reality, now spread mother to daughter and father to son, oblivious to who or what they are through the language of labels.

′′If you name me, you negate me. By giving me a name, a label, you negate all of the other things I could possibly be.”—Søren Kierkegaard

By labeling we restrict our awareness into believing forms equal separate things. Filtering away the surrounding fractals through instruction, pattern recognition, and negate the background with descriptive words—sounds and beliefs that drown out, distract, then dismiss the colloidal background which brings everything into view. the source energy, the vibration into forms. It is useful in some ways, but also has a cost.

Cymatic imagines on a Chladni plate— made from sound vibration replicates a Meso-American glyph

Here is a short cymatic demo.

In Inca the word for human body is alpa camasca literally meaning “animated earth”. This was a civilization which saw the human species formed from the vibrations of its world, as something with which it was spun into being, not a separate entity as is the common sense of today.

And Moses said “Now, for this cause I know that man is nothing (no thing) which thing I never had supposed. Not nothing as in worthless, or inferior, but man is literally no thing. It would be quite the epiphany for a Hebrew to realize he is a Buddhist.

In the beginning was the word” (sound) the vibration, the big bang, the primordial om, the name that cannot be named.

The name that cannot be named in Jewish Kabbalah is actually the complexity of frequencies that cannot be vocally duplicated (so far) because it is everything, in every thing. It cannot be named, not because it is sacred, but because it is impossible to speak its entanglement with a vocal assembly formed of a single layer wave oscillation.

Tesla stated; “If you wish to understand the universe think of energy, frequency and vibration” As demonstrated on the Chladni plate, imagine a cymatic that incorporated all possible frequencies and waves? We would have an earth full of life and variety. Vibration may be an important ontological link in an enormous puzzle.

“The energy in a single cubic meter of space is enough to boil all the oceans of the world”—Richard Feynman

Isn’t this odd? How can this be, if matter is as dense as it seems to be, and that so much energy is so elusive to harness?

On a final note, researches have noticed that honeycomb is formed as round holes, and only forms into a hexagon after the bee exits the hole. Their hypothesis is that it something to do with heat generated from the bee. I would hypothesize it is formed by the vibration of the hive. An article HERE

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

118 thoughts on “Adam—the First of His Kind”

  1. “Imagine being aroused from a deep sleep only to be hypnotized… “22 And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: In other words, man has been instructed to see the world in duality, that he and his actions are separate from his environment, which is not the natural state…of anything, and certainly not as “one of us” when a god, by every reasonable definition can be only non-dual.”

    Jim I am glad you are reading old texts and not just Christian/Jewish but other sorts as well.

    It is interesting that the author(s) of Genesis suggest God wanted to spare us from this dual view of the world. You seem to at least like the author recognize there is a cost.

    A more simple minded view I often hear is that author wants us to think God just wants us to remain ignorant. But that ignores that it is a specific type of knowledge God wanted to spare us from.

    One thing I believe is that people are not necessarily more insightful today than ancient people. Certainly we have more information, and thanks to books, have been able to collect wisdom. But I also think that book learning or learning facts is not always all that important. Let me just give and example.

    Someone I know had a daughter about 3 or 4 years old. And she was drilling this child with flash cards and trying to cram information into her head. And she justified by saying “why not?” And I thought two reasons. 1) you will make you kid uptight. and 2) it is not like your childs brain will just shut off and sit stagnant unless you bombard it with flashcards. That time she is spending trying to make her mom happy learning these facts is replacing the time she could be looking at the world for herself and forming her mind through observations of her own. I mean of course I believe in education and instruction etc. But I think there should be some balance because there is some cost.

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    1. Interesting statement this — But I also think that book learning or learning facts is not always all that important.

      Especially when one considers that the only “facts” Christians have about their faith is from a book.

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      1. I wouldn’t say the 73 books are all we know about our religion. But I do think there is a balance that we should strike in raising our children. It is important that they have time to experience the world on their own but they also should get some book learning as well.

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    2. I actually think book learning is a huge problem today. Libraries grow by osmosis, not by experience. We read books about books with the authority of the almighty footnote. There is no natural quiet nor uninfluenced observation—how can anything be observed without bias—which is the way things actually are.
      I am in favor of the old rites of passage where one can discover reality on their own. It is a lost art when the majority of existence is viewing 1 or 2 dimensional images.

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        1. You’ll have to define or describe “the father” for me for this to be a meaningful statement. What is that specifically?

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            1. Ok. Are you talking about god, the monarchial boss modeled after the kings of the Tigress and Euphrates culture, or the Protestant god modeled after the judicial court?
              The problem with this is we all have people and places in our path so this is a meaningless statement that changes nothing about reality or any interpretation of it. Predestination? 2nd, whatever Jesus thought of himself was not peculiar to himself at all. He thought he could teach it. You know, “that they may be one father, even as you and I are one”?
              By injecting Adam now as a title you have opened an entirely speculative POV where Jesus would not be the the last Adam but would also have to be the first Adam, unless you are Buddhist by chance?

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            2. ‘Jesus Christ is come in the flesh,’ is on the table. ‘That we should be called the sons of God.’ Adam was impatient, and Christ suffered.

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            3. If the story were true, Adam would have no idea what consequences were. No comprehension of death or punishment. How could that possibly count as falling from any kind of status? My explanation is much more sound and allies with every other religious philosophy and science.
              Jesus coming in the flesh? I know lots of people that have done that. That’s how we all are.

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            4. And you thought I was difficult! You have a live one on your hands with this bloke. Should we pray for you in the meantime, do you think?
              🙂

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            5. If y’all pray for me let’s at least document the outcome—Arnold will still pretend to believe and I’ll get some coffee. This is the risk of this type of post. I’m sure you noticed the first comment where somehow all the different mythology confirms jesus did it.

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            6. Indeed. As for prayer. If the Templeton study on Intercessional Prayer is anything to go by then the likely outcome will be Sweet Fanny Adams.
              But I am always open to be convinced otherwise …. through evidence of course.

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            7. Yes.
              There are however, long periods of silence following the pleas to deity, where one may figure his way out of the dilemma, which also gives the doctors time to diagnose and treat.
              If you believe hard enough the mind will also wrangle a way to justify the belief. That part is pretty predictable

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            8. God breathed life into the first Adam; the last Adam had God’s life from the get-go (Lk 1:35). ‘In the beginning was the Word.’

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            9. The notion of the biblical character Adam being an historical reality is of course nonsense as demonstrated by the the Human Genome Project.

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            10. @ Arnold
              Based on your current dialogue one can ascertain that you have accepted the Christian faith, very likely through some form of indoctrination. What was the emotional issue/trauma that caused you to become a Christian? Or were you indoctrinated from the knee?

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            11. Individuals like Arnold can only speak Christianese. To ask for a intelligent and thoughtful response is just taking up space on Jim’s blog.

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            12. Nan, I once took up that blog space too… From a biblical perspective he is still under the influence that knowledge was the original taboo©️. He’s merely repeating what he’s been told.

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            13. “Accepting the Christian faith” is a half-hearted stance. God wants moment by moment personal relationship via his Spirit in me. ‘Walk in the light’ means uncover everything to him. ‘And I will give you rest.’

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            14. @ Arnold.
              Fair enough, but this is not the question I asked.
              Unless you were raised as a Christian at the knee, I’m interested to know what was the turning point in your life either when you were a teen or a fully mature adult that made you decide to become saved?

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            15. (To me, being a child of God outranks any reasons I give, possibly even distracting you.) Anyway, 8 years ago my back was square in God’s face. Then late one night I blacked-out-drunk drove my car into a lake. After sobering up for a day or two I about-faced.

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            16. So trauma then, linked to alcohol abuse.
              Why were you unable to set yourself straight and free yourself from alcohol without belief in Yahweh?

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            17. As I stated … emotional trauma. It is a familiar story even if the details vary.
              Why did you feel you had to dismiss him?
              In fact why did you believe in the first place?

              This goes back to my initial question:
              Were you raised Christian at the knee or did you convert as a teen / more mature adult?

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            18. “At that time if anyone says to you, ‘Look, here is the Messiah!’ or, ‘There he is!’ do not believe it”—Mt 24:23

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            19. I was raised on bible, to acknowledge God. I reckon the dismissal part is Jonah-like. Running in the opposite direction.

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            20. Jesus loves children — in Mark 10:16, “he took them up in his arms.” Bias sets in as we age (grow up), so I’m blessed indeed to experience Christ as a youngster, on into my senior years. I’ve always known him.

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            21. Exactly WHO have you known? Is it someone that you shared dinner and drinks with? Or perhaps the two of you went on a hike together? Or is it someone you worked with?

              Or perhaps it’s an entity that’s never been seen or heard yet is said to exist within the pages of a several thousand year old book.

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            22. He looks like you and me jim! we’re made in his image- flesh and blood and spirit. I can’t describe my own spirit to you, except by these words you’re reading.

              This is me — he’s my life; I’m one with him just as he was with the Father and that’s the way I live day after day. Faith stands on Christ the eternal person. Nothing else.

              I don’t stand on Christianity, creeds, beliefs — I stand on Christ. He brought God to flesh and blood so to bring God to MY flesh and blood. ‘Immanuel, God with us.’

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            23. It’s my link to a previous post. Rather than rewrite the whole thing, show a little curiosity —and backbone. You have no faith in your faith?

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            24. Using cultural anthropology and dna evidence, your Jesus (because he blended in, remember, Judas had to point him out) was about 5’1” and a dark skinned Palestinian. Not that there is anything wrong with that. but you should know that is who you actually worship, not the flowing hair white guy with the western features.
              Seems like you would want to know the facts since your invested your whole life into this mirage.

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            25. Thanks, I appreciate you Jim. I worship the eternal Christ, not an image. The eternal One became flesh and blood for you and me. No, I can’t see him, yet I believe him. That’s about it.

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            26. He might only have been 5′ 1″ tall, but his friends and followers claimed he was very well hung.

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            27. I would just like to see a depiction of the real Jesus in church artwork. Wonder how many of these fundy church members would hang around too?

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            28. Hard to say. White Jesus doesn’t seem to deter non-whites from embracing the religion. In fact, the most fascinating aspect of Christianity is how easily it commands respect and fealty from those whom it conquers: first Europe, now the rest of the world. And it’s even more bizarre when you consider the fact that the script was concocted by the same group of misfits who gave us the “chosen people” prequel. Why would any sane person adopt the tribal god of its self-declared enemy?

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            29. It does go to show how thoroughly whitewashed entire cultures now celebrate the language of their colonizers , like they do in Central America. There is very little trace of the original.
              I got into a conversation with a Filipino catholic one day, she told me the Philippines was founded by Catholicism—like there was nobody of note there before the Catholics arrived. It’s even named after king Phillip, whose people really did a number on the natives. Now with the Muslims there, there is very little left of Filipino heritage at all. My wife is descended from the Babaylan, which is pretty amazing that she survived at all.

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  2. “This was the fall of man—the rapid decent into a fixed, measured reality”

    From a survival standpoint, the ability to quickly identify and communicate the presence of life-threatening plants and animals would be deemed a good thing — no?

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    1. Sure it’s a good thing, if survival is what it’s all about. Like I said, in this line of thinking these things have a cost. This measuring may very well lead to our demise as well, as most humans feel a need to combat nature as a third party observer.
      There have been civilizations that have been fully aware of danger, yet were more a part of the ecology than combatants.
      Our adaptability is greater than we think it is—without the bulldozers. I was watching an old Canadien film on the Eskimo. They followed them on the seal hunt. Frigid arctic weather and crawling around in the ice, mimicking the seal. What impressed me was none of them wore gloves. Amazing adaptation to the cold. I think we’ve lost that knowledge that we can truly live very well without draining the power grid for every little convenience. Granted, as I say that I sit in my heated office…

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      1. Well, I submit that survival is at the top of the “to do” list because dead people have little opportunity or desire to engage in contemplation. 🙂

        As for the Inuit, it’s true that they are (or at least were) well-adapted to their surroundings. But it’s equally true that they also developed a vocabulary to describe the things found within those surroundings.

        I agree that modern societies have lost touch with nature to the point that we’re now lost without our technological crutches, but I think that’s more to do with the natural human propensity to seek out comfort at all costs. Go up north and you’ll find that even the “traditional” native Americans have embraced the entrapments of modern life.

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        1. So you are saying vocabulary and natureal awareness can co-exist. Agreed. There were a lot of do-gooders involved in the process. Like with the Hopi, bringing in water lines destroyed a whole way of life. Now they have cinderblock houses, cable tv, and obesity. Modern? Yes of course. Better?

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            1. Yes, I’m aware of the historical decisions that led to this problem. And similar plans are in the works for the rest of us. It’s the reason why I distrust government and those who champion authority.

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    1. There is no secret hocus pocus knowledge about it either. It’s all right in the open. We’re simply trained from the onset to see it differently.

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    1. Thank you George. My mind just makes connections all over hell and back. Fortunately I can turn it off.
      A while back I was asked what kind of evidence would be considered ontological evidence. That these common threads exist in separated cultures and times makes me want to take a closer look. Similar to shamanism that had common threads in all places of the world. Many of these developed from their utility, not from some force fed philosophies of missionaries.

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  3. By labeling we restrict our awareness into believing forms equal separate things.

    You think so? By ‘labelling’, as you call it, we increase our awareness of what’s around us, and this in turn will hopefully lead us to a better understanding and strive for a greater appreciation of the marvelous diversity that is life, otherwise it is all merely a blur, the whitewash on a canvas that never sees another colour.

    Consider my own meagre endevours to catalogue and label all the fauna that visits my spot?

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    1. There is nothing wrong in your approach at all, unless you wanted to discover your ontological root.
      While I simultaneously agree with you, you’ve helped illustrate the point; you are cataloging wildlife, matching it up to a database and that’s it, that’s a hoopoe, or whatever we call it. But that isn’t what it is at all, but a process. Maybe it’s viruses benefit the ecosystem and it’s really a messenger bringing homeostasis to your region. What would you call that? How could you possible differentiate what it actually is, by what it actually does and call it Hoopoe?
      It is a convenient tool, but it is also a distraction.
      hopefully lead us to a better understanding and strive for a greater appreciation of the marvelous diversity that is life” the more we appreciate things the more we seem to wreck them. It may be our only hope is to appreciate things less, or at least at a distance.

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      1. Now your beginning to meander into philosophical waffle once more.
        I have no interest in metaphysics. It is as nonsensical as spirituality.
        Such posts quickly bounce all over the place like a pinball, becoming directionless and somewhat silly.

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        1. It is perfectly natural for you to feel this way. Maybe you’re overthinking it, or don’t understand the definitions?
          Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that examines the fundamental nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, between substance and attribute, and between potentiality and actuality”. From Plato to Kant, or Hume, this is a topic that interests a lot of great minds. It is ok not to be one of them. I’m not waffling nor agreeing, but simply presenting another point of view that is held by many.

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            1. I think this post encompasses a lot to digest. That vibration creates form is an outstanding observation you’ve poopooed without investigation. Even the bees produce this phenomenon. It is quite possible that vibration is a component of ontology that is overlooked but may be an important factor

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            2. Whatever evidence I provide will be insufficient. You’re wiki quote isn’t a very thorough investigation.
              You’re special pleading. The post is complete yet you’ve chosen one point to ignore the rest. If your neurology can have smell, is it a stretch that you can learn to control it?
              “Losing your sense of smell, known as anosmia, impacts not only your ability to detect odors, but also other areas of your life. Many individuals report a decreased quality of life with both temporary and permanent anosmia.

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            3. Whatever evidence I provide will be insufficient

              Sounds like every Christian apologist I have ever asked for evidence.

              No special pleading. You made an assertion I challenged it. Period.

              Losing one’s sense of smell is not the same as claiming one can turn it off at will. If I didn’t know better I might think you were being disingenuous.

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            4. I didn’t bring up sense of smell. Perhaps my first answer was Unresearched and presumptuous. Disingenuous? Never. I do think our minds can do more than you are giving credit for. It can heal you and make you sick as well. Placebo effect is a good example of that, as well as psychosomatic illness and recovery.

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            5. You jumped in after I asked monicat the question regarding turning off the sense of smell at will. Perhaps you didn’t read the comment properly or misunderstood?

              Where do you discern from my comments that I’m not giving credit to the ability of a positive mental framework and what can be achieved?

              Your reply is a good example of meandering and why such posts often devolve into waffle.
              Please try to stay focused on the point at hand.
              If you have evidence that the sense of smell can be turned off at will as originally claimed then provide it.
              Otherwise ….

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            6. As far as evidence goes, I am right about that, as in the past I have provided evidence on certain topics that you have readily dismissed and jumped to woo. The Polynesian navigators was one, and the other was the evidence in favor of shamanistic practice that was universal around the world. That should make one go hmm, and ask how? But not you. Your mind is made up yet the very science you believe in does not have an answer for it either.

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            7. Do you revel in being so obtuse, Jim, or is it an ego-fuelled sense of control you need to get off?

              Again …. evidence to verify the claim that one can turn off one’s sense of smell at will, please.

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            8. You didn’t read my comment. This is apparently your ego, not mine. I already stated “perhaps my statement was presumptuous and unresearched”.
              I feel you have an axe to grind. For someone with so little interest in ontology or metaphysics, you spend an awful amount of time needling mute points, yet offer no explanation.
              The post is about frequency and form. It’s a universal ancient belief . Bees make honeycomb and each frequency is a reliable form as demonstrated on the Chladni plate. Do you have an explanation for that? Would that at least make you curious, or you already have all the answers?

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            9. Of course I read your comment.
              At least have the integrity to admit there is no evidence of such a claim, rather than the pithy reply you offered.
              Again, my initial comment was in response to your labelling quote which I challenged. You then went off on a tangent, ,
              introducing ontology for some odd reason thus perfectly illustrating the point I made regarding the tendency to waffle.

              Let me remind you of your own words.
              ”Whatever evidence I provide will be insufficient.”
              Really? And just why do you think this is?

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            10. Because you’ve made up your mind. That’s pretty obvious. So much so that discussion outside of your preconceptions is impossible. Why do you think that is?
              So now I’ve asked a couple questions in the previous comment about vibration and you have ignored (again) to stroke whose ego?
              It is an interesting phenomenon I would think you could at least make a guess, or offer something, but no. Which is perfectly natural to defend your beliefs by handwaving and special leading, but it’s not very productive.

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            11. Because you’ve made up your mind.

              And there’s the pompous arrogance of one who has no evidence to provide. Now that is a perfect illustration of hand waving.
              The same tune one hears from apologists all the time.

              So now I’ve asked a couple questions in the previous comment about vibration and you have ignored (again) to stroke whose ego?

              It holds no interest for me.
              I commented on the part of the post that interested me.

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            12. It’s a discussion. You’re being a dick. And yes your mind is made up. I acquiesced a point and you can’t seem to let it go.

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            13. In actual fact my mind is very flexible. All I ask is what I ask anyone who makes claims that sound a bit ”out there”. Provide. The. Evidence.
              If there is no evidence to confirm a claim then be grown up enough to say so, but don’t tell me: ”Whatever evidence I provide will be insufficient” and then not even have the integrity to disclose what this evidence is.
              I’m just surprised you didn’t then go on to ask: ”What evidence would convince you?”

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            14. Your mind is very flexible. That’s why you chose a point not even related to the post. I’d be happy for you do discredit anything in it.
              When I made that comment I was on a ladder putting up tongue and groove on my ceiling. After your comment I retracted it based on an errant presumption. That is not good enough, so here you are. Your not even flexible enough to win a point and then let it go. Hmm

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            15. What point did I choose that was not related to the post Jim?

              When I made that comment I was on a ladder putting up tongue and groove on my ceiling

              Maybe you should consider you may have a minor addiction regarding blogging if you are that desperate you need to make a comment while up a ladder?

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            16. Well thanks for the tip. I’m on my day off and I can do whatever I want. Rawgod says he’s addicted, but between you and him pinging between posts, I think you have the most comments. What would that tell you? Is that evidence?

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            17. Yes, you can do whatever you want. Although you don’t have to whine either. But, of course, you can also do this if you want.
              However, answering a comment while up a ladder may be considered a tad extreme and somewhat of a health hazard.

              Free time is a godsend, and down here we are having a ling weekend. Today is a public holiday.

              So, what point did I choose that was not related to the post?

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            18. What may seem like a health hazard to you is simply routine for me. I can walk the walls, walk the ridge beam and the funny thing is, the more you concentrate the more likely you are to fall. But from the armchair it might look a little dicey. It’s only 14 feet, no worries mate. I can’t even drink coffee while I’m driving. People are amazing. Like carrying a poop bag when you walk your dog. After a while you don’t even think about it

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            19. It still begs the question as to why you would want to compose a blog comment while up a ladder?
              This sounds pretty desperate to me.
              But then, what do I know? Perhaps the world is full of steeplejack-type individuals like you who simply must reply to a blog comment the instant their phone ‘pings’ them.

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            20. As you reply just as your phone pings….
              Just imagine styling someone’s hair while holding scissors and talking at the same time? Why would you do that? Does that also beg a question?
              I think for an amateur blogger I’ve done ok. I’ll let you know if I need any help. Maybe you’d like to do a guest post? Who knows, you might get nominated for a sunshine blogger award.

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            21. Using a phone whilst up a ladder to reply to a blog comment may only need one hand, I doubt even Jesus could do carpentry single handed.
              From down here on the ground, your priorities seem somewhat skewed.

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            22. Nope. I did not ignore the content at all and addressed your labelling quote, and went on to explain why I have no particular interest ( at this juncture) in the rest of the post. You then went on a tangent.

              So, what point did I choose that was not related to the post?

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            23. Since you have a habit of ignoring direct questions that don’t interest you, I am simply following your lead. Who’s on a tangent now?

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            24. Once again, I answered your question on labels in the 3rd or fourth comment. Yet I get the feeling you are more interested in meaningless, repetitive questions than actually reading the response. This is borderline narcissism, if not outright. I have lost plenty of arguments and likely will continue to. It is how I learn. On the other hand, you never seem to be wrong about anything. This is a personality trait very hard to overcome, but help is available if you seek it out.

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            25. I have lost plenty of arguments and likely will continue to. It is how I learn.

              This is an argument?
              However, if arguments are how you learn then perhaps you need to integrate several less confrontational social skills into your one-handed texting-cum-woodworking- ladder gymnastics.
              I feel confident in suggesting you will likely learn faster and learn more reality orientated topics along the way.

              So, as you have yet to respond to repeated requests regarding what point that was not related to the post I can only educe that this was probably another up-the- ladder ‘oops’ moment and now you are trying to cover your tracks by hiding it in the dirt box like a kitty.

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            26. Assume away. Maybe part of your problem is conforming to what freethinkers are allowed to think. Your boxed in so hard you cannot even imagine.
              Maybe you could address the key tene(n)ts of the post and offer an explanation how vibration may or may not be a key point in creation/evolutionary processes?

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            27. Now you are sounding petulant.
              Whining really doesn’t suit you.

              Maybe you could address the key tene(n)ts of the post and offer an explanation how vibration may or may not be a key point in creation/evolutionary processes?

              I already stated that at the moment it holds no interest for me.

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            28. Now you are sounding petulant
              Whining really does seem to suit you. Whining about not getting your way—suits you fine. It’s funny how you project so much. If you don’t like the topic or the host you’re welcome to leave.

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  4. Hello Jim, there is no limit to how much humans insist on naming each other and in presuming the ownership of all the dominion. In Genesis, livestock are already created, already domesticated, already set to adorn the dining tables. There is nothing that remains uncataloged, nothing that does not get named for the utility they provide to homo sapiens. Boundless ego prevails and then seeks ever more.

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  5. long before the wave-particle duality concept, the ancients had already realized that the universe is emitted from sound as pulsating waveforms (Spanda) which, interacting with the five sense organs, create the temporary illusory hologram we call ‘world’.
    the world only appears to be dense – go deeper into matter, and all we find is empty space.

    this pulsation of the universe is always expanding and contracting, coming into being and dissolving back again into non-existence.

    sound is very interesting. it is the last sense to go when we die. it is said that even when people are in a coma, they can hear us when we speak to them.
    it is also the only sense that we cannot ‘turn off’ at will, like the others.
    sound is said to bind us to the hologram, and also to have the power to awaken. many Zen poems focus on sound in the process of enlightenment.

    this is an awesome post! so many juicy things here.

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    1. You changed your monicker, monicat. Isn’t this an interesting phenomenon? The cymatics are completely reliable too. Each step in frequency produces its own geometric shapes, every time. If you do it to water and add some solids the patterns actually take 3 dimensional shapes. One I saw they added some cornstarch and it actually looked like the formation of a brain.
      You can duplicate the spots of a leopard or the shape of a sunflower. Makes ya wonder.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. very fascinating! if consciousness is the substratum (Ramana’s words) of the existing universe, vibrational frequencies cause disturbances that give rise to different forms. we take the form to be the real, but in fact, it is the undelaying essence that determines what the form is.

        matter is said to be consciousness that vibrates very low, so it appears very dense. the higher in frequency you go, the more refined the form (emotions, thoughts, feelings, are all forms of consciousness) until you reach the source, pure consciousness, where there is no form at all. why it’s called ‘formless’, or ‘un-manifested’, or ‘unborn’.

        our face before we were born! heheh

        i could write a whole book, but i’ll leave that to rawgod 😋

        Liked by 1 person

    2. …it (sound) is also the only sense that we cannot ‘turn off’ at will,

      Really? You can turn off your sense of smell at will? That must surely be a unique talent.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. it is possible to hold your breath, you know. and then there is no smell. i do that when i go in the washroom after my husband

        Liked by 2 people

            1. Master meditators turn off their senses all the time.
              Can you provide verified evidence of this please? In particular the sense of smell.
              Hypnosurgery: I googled it.
              ”There is insufficient evidence to support the efficacy of hypnosis in managing pain in other contexts, such as childbirth[3] or post-operative pain”
              Once again, the claim was to turn off the sense of smell at will. This does not qualify.

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          1. i don’t know why you’re so hooked to sense of smell. if you think of it, we don’t spend all day smelling things, only when some scent arises.

            the emphasis is on sound and hearing, which flows non-stop from the moment we wake up till we fall asleep. unless you cover your ears.
            and, if you pay attention, you’ll notice it is also the last to go before you fall asleep. you cannot stop your hearing.

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            1. I am wondering of it is your reading skills or comprehension skills?
              If you pay attention maybe you will work out which one it is?

              Liked by 1 person

            2. nice!
              what are you trying soo hard to protect? your own world view?? and if so, why?

              Like

  6. Wow. What a nice piece, man. After believing in Jesus, I came across these passages. They seemed to reflect a perception I gained while tripping.

    Colossians 1:17 He himself is before all things and all things are held together in him.(He= the word)

    Hebrews 11: 3 By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the visible has its origin in the invisible.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for the compliment. The post is a bit conflated and clumsy. Somehow it probably should have been 2.
      The problem with Jesus and monotheism is it is at odds with what we discover, what god would actually be if it existed, even had the Hebrews in contradiction from the very beginning.
      Granted this theme has roots in all religion, but there is no boss of it all.
      Jesus did not find this situation peculiar to himself at all. It was a method he was trying to teach.

      Liked by 2 people

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