Suffering—Good, Evil, or indifferent?

On the fallacy of heaven

Wouldn’t the end of suffering also mean the end of awareness? Thinking of it in Judeo/Christian terms—in the “spirit world” a third of the hosts of heaven are currently suffering—cast out. It seems as though the dream of eternal bliss is either undeliverable, or deception. It certainly fails any test of reason or logic when “souls” are suffering in the heavens as we speak.

The end of suffering would mean the end of awareness. One cannot experience bliss unless able to experience discomfort. In life (even afterlife) there would have to be darkness in order to comprehend the light. If eternal existence in the heavens is all bliss, it would mean there is no light or dark contrast to raise awareness. It would be the end of awareness, which awareness only happens if there is polarity. Yin, and yang, front, back, up, down, light, dark—life and death.

Imagine if it was all pure white forever and ever? No contrast. Bland. The only form of awareness is the awareness of form, the whole cloth—and it’s a two sided one.
When it’s lights out it is like a dreamless sleep where you never wake up. How would you know then you’ve been led with a carrot by controlling men who never, ever, have to show you results—ever?
Whatever one may think will happen, the awareness of existence is polarity—without it there would be nothing at all. In other words; life now, as you and your families live so beautifully, is the best game going in the universe. This is heaven—it is also hell. But when you break on through to the other side—resorption back into the cosmic whole. Think, where do chicken pox go after they’ve run their course?

Christian ego is a useful illusion to perpetuate a great game, for there truly could only be one “soul” and that is consciousness, the cosmic background of all existence of a single organism.

If there is life beyond mortal living it is in one, contradictory free thought process—meaning ultimately it is all one thing. And as Hindu philosophy has solved the problem of evil—everything that happens, happens to god, and it is everything—there is nothing that is not god. There are no victims here, no one to blame but its yearning to placate the boredom of infinite living.

If there were a Christian heaven, the most difficult, eternal task would then be; how to unremember all the friends and family that didn’t make it. The end of suffering? Oh no! Just the beginning…