On Doctrine

Understanding the nuts and bolts of Christian longevity

In order to be effective, a doctrine must not be understood, but has rather to be believed in. A doctrine that is understood is shorn of its strength“—Eric Hoffer

A doctrine to be effective must be viewed from the heart, not from the brain, to maintain staying power.

“The devout are always urged to seek truth with their hearts and not their minds

Rudolph Hess, when swearing in the entire Nazi party in 1934, exhorted the hearers: “Do not seek Adolf Hitler with your brains—all of you will find him with the strength of your hearts”.

It is obvious today more than ever that the true believer is just that—a believer that doesn’t understand the doctrine. Everyone else is doing it wrong sounds familiar, and many Christians are now despising Christianity—the outcome of the doctrine.

When we fully understand the doctrine (like we do the nazi party) we can no longer believe in it based on its historical and current condition—we capitulate to self doubt, ride it out, or leave.

Atheism is proof that the doctrine can eventually be understood”. That is evidenced in the current exodus.

Spending a lifetime ironing the contradiction of abrahamic religion is imperative from the beginning that conundrums existed to sustain the longevity of the movement.

If a doctrine is not unintelligible, it has to be vague. If neither unintelligible nor vague, it has to be unverifiable”Eric Hoffer

To secure a lasting movement, Christianity incorporated all three—and the proof is in its longevity.

It’s hard to imagine that this trifecta was accidental, since every single point of doctrine is Alpha and Omega of contradiction.

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