Knowing the un-Knowable

How Pride in pretending sustains belief

Of all the gods that ever lived in the minds of men that have come and gone, the one with the most staying power never even showed up. The others—ousted by the unknown god that doesn’t do anything, can’t be approached, proven, described nor touched. Even our own imaginations that created him cannot imagine his omnipotence, for anything we can imagine or explain, he must be bigger, staying above the fray of explanations way—for the sake of the profession it must remain this way.

Curious sky—NE Washington

In Acts 17, Paul hits a masterful homerun on the first swing: “Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars’ hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, To The Unknown God. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you”

So thus it is—Paul begins the religion of contradiction with a contradiction. He claims to know the god that can’t be known, condemns superstition by introducing the most blatant superstition in known history. They took the bait! Hook, line, and sinker and have poisoned lowered the minds of humanity to prideful pretending. They know something they readily admit they don’t know—“God is naught but in the minds and yearnings of insecurity”. But to pretend to know what can’t be known, certainly has a tidy little smugness about it, doesn’t it (wink)