Contemplating Existence—The Why is in Asking

How to benefit from recognizing fundamental problems of human nature—The first flaws

The human mind is easily misdirected and manipulated. The simple question has now been hammered into a science—the number one tool of the salesman, psychoanalysts, politicos, and religiosos. Merely asking a question puts the asker in control of the conversation—and the human brain can’t help but go there.

Questions trigger a reflex in humans known as “instinctive elaboration,” that is when someone asks you a question, the question takes over the brain’s thought process and you feel compelled to answer—and make it a good one.

The meaning of life is undiscovered to this day, but it all started long ago by three unanswered questions

  • Why we are here?
  • Where did we come from?
  • Where are we going?
  • After millenniums of daydreaming answers on existence, now we are forced to answer “what if”—what if I’m wrong about what you’ve imagined to be so?
  • Here is my question; Are you certain your feelings, that combination of hormones, insecurities, bias, influences, hope, and consciousness—evidence of a god? Or is it simply evidence of an ever changing and susceptible mess of neurons, chemicals reactions, and underdeveloped controls?

    When our brain thinks about the answer to a question, it can’t contemplate anything else” (1)

    We can generally think of only one thing at a time, while our limited ability’s and myopic mental focus practically force us to contemplate simply because of the suggestion—or the question. “Do you believe in god” has been a question that has lingered at the forefront throughout my lifetime and a thousand generations before. Why no, I don’t believe in an imagination what has puzzled even the best minds in history. A question that deserves no answer, but is an irresistible consideration nonetheless, because it was asked.

    With all that is known about our psychological discrepancies and deficiencies, do you think it would be wise to proceed with caution before believing anything without evidence. Any of it? Why should I believe anything at all without it?

    What makes one so sure that the potpourri of impressions and feelings about every aspect of life is a god, considering all of his presence and “feelings” and your own intuitions can be duplicated in any laboratory study, even with outright lies? How do you know it’s god, not the neurons and hormones deceiving yourself—with yourself, practically by the force of the question? Isn’t it far more reasonable that the idea of a god is just as unreasonable? The ultimate force in the universe is not a god—it is the almighty question. And that is far more interesting than settling for a thought. There are no answers. That, is evidence I can live with.

    Where is your Evidence for no God

    This is the type of question designed to deflect responsibility to explain a claim something exist one has no proof for.

    I stated — “Atheism is a lack of belief. ”

    His response — True, but you stated that you believe something. you stated: “the reality that there is no god”. Where is your evidence of no God?

    What answer will suffice to demonstrate to a believer that the “evidences” that claim for a god are strictly emotions and feelings or spectral evidences that are not valid for proof in any setting—but religion? The mere fact that he has to use that particular question, is evidence there is no gods out yonder in the heavens that tinkers in the lives of humans.

    Ben-Life after religion is a fantastic and thoughtful blog. If you haven’t stumbled into it yet, take a look.