An Enemy to God—The Natural Man

How the natural man is actually embedded in belief.

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Being judged and sentenced by believers of god for a passive decision—a process of random inputs, neurons, billions of synapses interacting, perceptions weighed, likes and dislikes and cultural influence considered, simply for not believing a story—merely thoughts.

After having to process this information against my own choice, the ticket has popped out unbelief. What can I do to change that? What should be done to appease the masses…conform to become a natural man—gullible, trusting, yielding, herd instinctive, and fearful since birth? The desire to belong clouds judgement while the powerfully placed men of words and their yes-men apply pressure to consider the supernatural—by coercion.

A natural man does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; and he cannot understand them, because they are spiritually appraised—1 Corinthians 2:14-15

Au contraire! A neat trick of religion and the biblicants is defining terms to suit their purpose. The natural man is actually the believing man as evidenced in the obvious. Everyone wants a belief. Since birth we are lied to, fearized, pressured, goaded—and though living in a society of liars we believe nearly everything that we are persuaded to believe. That, is the natural man. Either the believer is the enemy of god as the Bible says, or the Bible has decriminalized our natural tendencies and labeled the unnatural, independent-minded as the enemy. I am not the natural man. Having eyes that have opened through a struggle of librarial pursuit and observation, followed by the unpleasant task of unbelief, integrity will not undo this fact.

The strongest faith can’t protect us once we know the truth. Protection comes through conformity and abandoning honest virtue—integrity comes at a price. We now sit on the fringes of society writing anonymous blogs. Natural man? I’ll leave that to the churches where it’s modern version originated.

Scientific Points for Religion—The Switch

Consensus between religion and science is happening, but it’s a one way street.

One of the interesting developments of religion is the attachment to scientific theory and advancement to suit their purposes. Evolution being the largest swing in recent memory, but also shoehorning bits and bobs of the Big Bang—calling out “god did it” and the insistence there had to be a first-cause to set it all in motion. It didn’t, and most likely there never was nothing.

Simple reason can point that out better than a god, and if anyone can display the ultimate in proving a negative—prove there was ever nothing… we obviously have these materials in front of us—more than you could ever say about a god. There’s no magicians trick here. The universe is a brute fact. Myth, however, is the true basis of religion, now making scientific claims using secular reasoning.

Even if per chance the world is a 3D simulation, there also then has to be a supreme all righteous omnipotent god at the helm, right? Pure bias is religion staking claims on what they had denied forever. When the curtain is pulled back we would most likely see a fossilized crazy scientist dead in his chair after working himself to the bone trying to fix his experiment that got away. Whatever discoveries man seems to find, religion has god in all his power drip-feeding advances to share his love.

The idea that a god has to be supremely infallible of perfect righteousness is a pipe dream of runaway human imagination. And imagine, is what we do quite well. Simply reading the scriptures shows us through unbelief—their construct of god is a prick—unless you imagine otherwise.

Which brings us to consensus. How many religious points do the atheist agree? None. How many points of science do the religious adopt hijack? Nearly all of them. Its not that hard when you have an actual model that produces results. Creationism Origins is the last puzzle to solve. What then will the believers do with their god? Another claim as part of the masters plan?

-7° with a High of 13° Fahrenheit—Snowing

How religious collapse is nothing to fear.

If this world per chance is a simulation, today would be a good day to pull the plug. Which got me thinking (of course) about what would happen if we pulled the plug on religion.

Air traffic controllers go through an extensive, escalating simulation for several weeks before taking over their assigned airspace, but what happens to the simulator, after hours of stressful (that part is real) training is unplugged and the lights turned off?—Nothing

Enter Religión—

Disconnecting from religion (another simulation without substance) seems at first would be a catastrophe, is in actuality extremely empowering and calming. “The moment I realized there was no god, I looked back down at the house and realized I’ve got this—I always had” I’ve been on my own my entire life. Wow! The stress I felt by religion was also real. Contemplating a life of no gods was a brief moment of unwarranted worry. Moving from simulation to the control tower is an easy transition.

It reminds me of when President Obama signed the marriage equality bill. No lightning, no thunder, nobody struck dead, just a thunderous applause stifling the fear of the religious right. And what has happened since? No second coming, no global upheaval, nothing but positives.

What happens after the lines are erased and religion folds? Nothing…Nothing but personal responsibility and liberty of mind to chart your own course within the framework of civil law. We’ve got this. We always have. It’s about people proudly helping people, giving and taking credit where it is due—to us!

What I Believe—

How intense beliefs fail humanity—

I believe that mere belief without evidence has been unjustly elevated to the gold-standard of ones knowledge and character.

I see intense belief in anything is a seedbed of tribalism—

That belief undermines real academics and embraces mediocrity.

I know when belief is required to be part of group, the group will betray you over unbelief.

I’ve observed and experienced the key to understanding the mysteries™️ is unbelief.

I understand the universe is a diverse array of energies and dimensions where some people are attuned more so than others to it.

I believe the foibles of human neurology, perception, and bias need to be understood at a grade school level to promote tolerance of difference and friendship—all of us!

I notice that religious beliefs need to be protected by law because they cannot stand on their own merits.

I observe herd instinct, peer pressure, indoctrination, and impatience supplants reason.

I believe the ability to hand-wave contradiction and fallacy hardwires neurons through repetition and submission. The problem is now in the physiology.

I believe faith should never be the end-goal of intellectual achievement.

I found that submitting your will to belief in god/allah, or any other godform disempowers the best part of human nature, delays intellectual advancement and personal achievement.

I would wager belief should never be intended as a solution and should be the least respected of all professions.

I believe that mans impatience has allowed him to be conned by men of self importance. Now the prisoners drive the ship.

I think that humanity is much older than we realize, that man has appeared on the scene several times in multiple generations of geologic time—things are much stranger in the past than we realize. We are much more capable than we realize too.

I believe that any belief should be able to provide some empirical data, and transition from belief to pure knowledge in a reasonable amount of time.

I’ve observed that big box religion and one-size-fits-all dogmas are inadequate to provide the needs of nearly 8billion differing physiologies—evidenced by each member choosing for himself the parts of morality and teaching (s)he already knows.

I believe people’s beliefs are merely hunches, feelings, intuitions—guesses, if you will, they’ll divide their families and friends over. I also believe that is immoral.

I believe coffee was the second greatest product of plant evolution.

Crossing the Line

How religion has dug itself into the dark…and keeps digging

Escaping religion required me to cross over into the neighbors pasture. At night and under the cover of darkness, spreading open the barbed wire meant to protect me, I would venture into his fields. I later learned the fence was there to keep me in, not the other way around. I can distinctly remember the change, that feeling of uneasiness venturing into forbidden paths—but nothing is the way I was warned.

Exploring Washington’s train tunnels is fascinating. Three long tunnels connect the east to the west, shortening track and steep climbs by hours, opening up into a new climates and breathtaking views.

One such tunnel under Snoqualmie Pass has been decommissioned and is now a hiking trail (although most people just drive over it unaware it exists) that in 2.3 miles connects the east and west.

Built in 1910, straight as a string, you can see a pinhole of light at the other end. It’s about a 45 minute walk, and the view at the end is incredible. The men that dug this and built this railroad performed an astonishing feat for the time.

Enter religion—

Religion has an uncanny way of digging itself in—there is no light at the end of the tunnel. The line is not straight and has wandered “to and fro, from the north and even to the east” to seek the answers of life’s questions…and nothing. When does the spectacular view emerge as you break out into the light? No one can say—just keep digging. All the while, no unfinished project boondoggle is too long for religion. Never a breakthrough in a never ending struggle for relevance. Faith is the ultimate play on the human psyche.

And into the dark

Born Again—Again

How deconverting from faith is more exhilarating than being saved

Faith and belief as a temporary, trial-state to work towards a fact may be a useful tool in the short term. But as a endgame achievement…not so fast.

Trying the words of faith are essential to proving all things, as taught in the Bible, but who actually does that? Atheists? And how much time should you allow for such proofs? 80 years? 1000? Will you pray with me to know if there is a god? Will you pray with me to see there isn’t?

Mormon missionaries ask you to pray to believe “if these things are not true according to the desires of your heart”. How does that work inciting a negative counter to ones desire to believe?

Psychology of praying for what you want to believe is a well known phenomenon in the mathematics of mindfulness. Odds are in your favor that sometimes you’ll get what you ask for—even if you mumble some crap under your breath. Especially if you pray like everything depends on god, then work like everything depends on you. What essentially prayer comes down to is arrogance. Is god willing to override physics in your special case, often to the detriment of another individual—like commanding tornadoes in the name of Jesus, into another neighborhood, or denying someone a dignified and speedy death to suit your own insecurities?

When you realize there is no god and no prayer is answered, there is no loneliness or despair that settles in. To the contrary. You’ve been doing this on your own your entire life anyway—with a little help from people. The self empowerment of this reality is astonishing clarity. The key to understanding the mysteries is unbelief.

Conversion—Submitting yourself to belief in what you can’t prove or know in hope of reward or answers, effectively separating your rational mind for fantasy. Relying on someone else to give your life meaning.

Deconversion—The aha moment followed by the haha moment. You already held the answers you sought. There is no mystery.

Happy New Year everybody. We won’t get fooled again.

View From a Horse—

Sometimes things aren’t what they seem, even after they seem like it

Sometimes you miss the best scenery watchin’ where you’re going—Frank

Riding a horse on the trail is near like bein’ a truck driver on the road—a bird’s eye view down into places most folks think ought to be private. I told LT this piece when I dropped by his place—I think he actually peed himself. I won’t do that again. Bein’ careful who you talk to is important, and he may just remind me about this the rest of my life—plus everyone else. He knows how I was raised in the strict confines of religion—and so do I—most of the time.

I’ve hiked nearly the entire Pacific Crest Trail within the Washington border and a thousand other miles between, and never saw what I’ve seen riding half that time on a horse. Walkin’ you spend a lot of time checkin’ the trail and watchin’ your footing to keep you upright—like one time I was on an eight day backpack from Darrington to Stevens Pass. I’d been into it about sixty miles or so when I stepped off the edge and rolled down about fifty feet. I crawled out of it ok, but one second of distraction at the wrong time can be a catastrophe in the back county. Riding a horse alleviates a lot of that—it also makes me about nine feet tall which allows me to see, and seein’ too much in the pejorative sense can make you go blind, according to my mother.

A lifetime of parental warnings does not necessarily protect you from anything, sometimes goin’ blind can be a real eye opener—Frank

My first time seein’ nature happenin’ in the human sense was from the trail, and it looked like more of a scuffle than I had imagined it would. A hiker would’ve never seen it bein’ too short, and that particular part of the trail was a little bit technical, so watchin’ your footing was important—I caught a glimpse of a red blanket down my the stream, so I backed up my horse just a touch to see what was going on, peering over the brush I aimed to solve this curious eye catching red amidst the greenery. Nature was taking its’ course in the wild—two buck naked souls in a passionate tussle. I sat back in my saddle for a spell and watched. I decided I’d better move along…but then I watched some more. I thought for a minute there something was wrong ’cause she was hittin’ him on the back and makin’ a lot of painful noise, but after they were done doin’ what they were doin’ she gave him a big hug.

It wasn’t at all what I expected, but I did find myself pressing my toes hard into the stirrups. Maybe I was gettin’ my footing there a little bit too. The year before I was in Jamaica and we went to a nude beach—optional, but the only people that had no clothes on were the ones that should’ve. This wasn’t like that at all. I thought about it quite a bit over the next few days, then I thought about it again…and then some more—hell I was seventeen, what was I supposed to do?

Some people aren’t so subtle or sneaky about their nudity. I was headed down to Deroux from Gallagher Head Lake and there was a female hiker coming alone up the trail—topless. She stepped up on the high side to let me pass, said hello, and I said hello back—but what I was thinkin’ was a whole lot different. Keepin’ eye contact is not as easy as they say it is, and back to nature was takin’ on a whole new view for my wanderin’ ways—and eyes.

Changing your thinkin’ is hard…especially when you don’t want to—Frank

I reminded myself of Saint Augustines prayer when he was a young man. “Lead us not into temptation Lord, give me chastity,” he prayed, “but not yet”. I did a lot of thinkin’—and even more thinkin’ after this happened.

Bein’ on my way to base camp one day I came up to Lake Ann and stumbled into another situation once again, but things aren’t always the way I’d been raised. I was heading up from Van Epps, and from that direction the lake is just appears in front of you with no warning—a bit of a nice surprise. Coming in from the top you get a bird’s eye view and you can see what’s ahead of you, but not this way.

It doesn’t matter where you are, only the direction your headed—Frank

I wasn’t payin’ close attention and rode right up to the lake to see two guys standing there on the boulder naked, holding hands looking at the water. They heard me, and when they saw me they just looked over their shoulders and said hello, then the taller one jumped down and walked over to me to ask a couple questions. We talked a little about the area, then I let them know that the ridge on the trail to the west had the best view of Mount Rainier anywhere—it’s amazingly close as the crow flies, and breathtaking to see, to say the least. My household growing up was a modest bunch, so after contact of this nature I had some thinking to do, and somehow nudity didn’t equal shame anymore. When I told the story to LT he said I looked like I’d seen a ghost. And that ain’ all I’d seen, that’s for sure, but un-seein’ is a whole other story. That makes two things I know.

If you look around and cut through all the deception, things are rarely what you’ve been told—Frank

I guess if you spend enough time anywhere you’ll find oddities and different ways of life. Funny it was the open wilderness where I slowly started to see life from another point of view, although a bit of it was a little too “up close” at the time.

Things aren’t always what they seem, even after they seem like it—Frank