Gremlins and Fairies

How superstition trumps reality and mere fables survive generations

I have a plan when I return to Panama. My neighbor up the way has gold buried in his yard. Yep, real gold buried years ago to hide it from the Spanish. He has sworn me to secrecy, but pretty sure y’all could never trek to his spot in the jungle.

One day he came by the house to borrow my metal detector (I think it’s the only one in Panama) to see if he could get to the treasure before the gremlins move it…again. Every time he locates a spot, they shift it away from the hole faster than he can dig. Every time we’d get a good tone, by the time he digs deep enough, all we find is a clavo de concreto or some other iron junk and the gold is gone…Mostly the gremlins would leave a nail. Superstition is deep in the interior. Old ways are slow to die, especially with these oral superstitions passed on like a religious legacy. I have a plan…

Maybe I’m too cruel, but I’m fashioning a few these small doors to cut into some trees on his property. You think he’ll appreciate my sense of humor?

Horrible Ideas Inspire The Most Philosophy—Faith

The simplicity of the gospel has publishers rolling in cash generated from Christian publications.

Before self publishing access boomed in the early 2000’s, about 7500 new Christian titles every year crowded book stores shelves in USA English with cluttered explanations on every jot and tittle. This is when publishers could filter out the weak from the sellable versions. Now the numbers are around 786,935 English language books published are assigned a catalog number per year in the U.S. on Christianity alone. Finding new and improved ways to exonerate the confusion and simplicity of the gospel is a competitive cash-cow of cleverly worded conjecture.

One publisher stated, “Most of our (traditional) publishers are trying to figure out how to get more out of fewer books“. It’s the same story over and over—good luck with that.

We often turn to the Greeks for their wisdom and eloquence in presenting wordsmithing sense into religion using philosophy. Remember, it is a cleverly worded failure from a collapsed society that mixed religion and politics with the grandest, most beautiful of explanations. We still look to anything scribbled in Greek to conjure up validation. They were so eloquent in their words that even fiction has spawned archaeology hunts.

If shear volume of religious commentary are any indication of another society in the brink, Christianity today is ripe for collapse. And someday, hopefully, we’ll all write about surviving that blessing. The most declinitive words to ever influence the numbing of human thought, leading whole civilizations to their celebrated stagnation—Do you believe in god?