Missionaries, Covid Superspreaders, and Evolution

How the virus seeks a host to do its bidding

“Why I don’t believe” reason number 1; evidence.

Seeing what Christianity has done to indigenous cultures throughout the world as a token of love, spreading while being resisted is more in line with evolution than a loving god.

We had a similar event here this past month. Boasting about a fever and making her way around campus, an adult covid denier (superspreader) made her way around campus, became ill, tested positive, and put 80 students and 9 staff members in two weeks of quarantine.

Not that every staff member took it seriously either, as the self -quarantined can be seen at the grocery store and gas pumps chatting away face to face with whomever.

Who is in charge here, god, the people, or the virus? Spoiler alert! The virus is in charge. You can believe it is not, but evidence suggests otherwise. Resisting is futile.

As humans also continue to spread against all will and reason, it is obvious our agendas are not linked to the outcomes. We are not controlling anything at all, but do what we do thinking thoughts that make us think we’re somehow special, yet march to the beat of chaos on a competing ecosystem functioning to maintain its equilibrium.

The virus has found a foothold in the believers of religion and conspiracy. Operating on belief and others belief as usual, it doesn’t miss a beat. You can do everything to protect yourself—then here comes Cindy…

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

109 thoughts on “Missionaries, Covid Superspreaders, and Evolution”

  1. God cannot stop the virus. Humans are at least trying. I’m 71 years old. I don’t care about 10 or 20 years down the road. I won’t live that long. Without vaccines, I may be dead in a week. With vaccines I may last 5 years. My chouce was clear. I am fully vaccinated for now. If I need a booster shot next year, I will get one.

    Liked by 2 people

          1. Not for me, there is isn’t Jim. Deities make no sense. Life is what is happening, here and throughout the cosmos. No one is in charge. Never has been. Never will be.
            Deities are supposed to bring order. Our cosmos is chaotic, and always will be.

            Liked by 3 people

            1. As you say, from a distance. Life is not lived at a distance, it is lived in the here and now. No matter how much you try to organize your life, chaos happens. You get fired from a job, a car smashes into your living room window, the guy next door goes on a shooting rampage, your spouse falls in love with someone else. There is no end to what can and will happen, no matter how much money you make, or how hard you work. Chaos! If deities create chaos, then I might look at believing. But according to all human religions, deities are supposed to work to keep things in order. It just makes no sense.

              Liked by 3 people

            2. What appears to be chaos at one level of magnification is completely harmonious at another. You wouldn’t know what chaos was, unless there was also order. The two go together.
              Look at a beautiful, healthy area of skin. It is soft, supple, durable, good color and perfectly beautiful. But if you zoom-in under the microscope you see there is a war going on. Bacteria and phages battling, and most of the time it is completely harmonious at regular magnification. So it is with all life and the cosmos. What appears to be a complete mess at one level, is total order when you step back and see the forest through the trees.
              All in all the universe is in total harmony with all life dependent on the good and the bad. That is not chaos unless you decide to scrutinize one part under magnification, or focus on one thing at a time which is basically what humans are capable of.
              Which level of magnification is the correct one?

              Liked by 1 person

            3. I prefer the microcosm. Were the Vogons to build a highway through the orbit of earth. no one else would know we are gone. Neither would we, lol.

              Liked by 1 person

            4. but why view it as chaos? why not see these things as catalysts for change? if things were to stay the same, there would be no movement. life would be stagnant. sometimes the greatest things come out of a chaotic circumstance. and anyway, these dramatic events don’t last forever. they are always temporary. don’t you agree?
              i know of many cases where cancer patients change their lives dramatically for the better after the illness. so… the storm is never permanent, the sun always comes out from behind the clouds

              Liked by 1 person

            5. Oh, I agree, change comes best from disagreeable circumstances, so one has to be open to them–to learning.
              I used to be an optomist, sure that all would be well, but I found I learned better by being a pessimist. I continually chide myself, I could be dead, but I haven’t got there yet. However, I know it is coming, lol.

              Liked by 1 person

            6. are you familiar with near death experiences (NDE’s)? i’ve been listening to few dozen over last few weeks (just because they are so freakin’ fascinating) and there’s so much to learn from them. here’s one of the best, if you’re curious. these are people that are declared clinically dead, and yet make incredible returns and recoverings. another great one is Dr Eben Alexander, who is a neurosurgeon that was comatose for few weeks, and came back to full and unexplained healing. amazing stuff! what is it that dies??

              https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=jane+thompson

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            7. I was never declared clinically dead, but if you are willing to believe, I had two death experiences as an almost adult that could be taken as such. I take them as such, though the NDE people do not because they were triggered by pychedelic drugs. Drugs can kill just as easily as cars or bullets can, but I will leave that there. I wrote about my experiences on my blog that you just followed, and those experiences changed my life wholesale. Alternatively you can contact me at gewcolo@gmail.com if you would like to converse about them and other things.
              So, t’es, I know about NDEs, and I also know what most people experience they describe according to their own belief systems. I was in transformation when I experienced my events, so I feel what I saw was possibly a different truth from what others describe.
              I have not checked for a long time, but last time I looked the researchers were only looking at NDEs in North America and Europe. I would love to read about NDEs in other places, like Africa and India, Iran or China. That would give us a better perspective of how they are compare and contrast according to culture and community.
              Sorry, I am rambling, but you brought up a subject very dear to me, and questions I have around them. I will shut up and go read the site you suggested. Thank you.

              Liked by 1 person

            8. yes, i too was very curious to compare experiences from people of other faiths. the only one i found on youtube was a Hindu man, a scientist who was completely against any concept of ‘god’. His name is Jang Jaswal. His story is fascinating because he was extremely ill most of his life ( i think he suffered kidney failure and had a heart transplant!) he came back and enjoyed more health than in his entire life. this is a common thread, i found, people with NDE’s come back to undergo incredible healings and health.
              Thanks for the email!

              Liked by 1 person

            9. Hi monicat,
              I just went looking for some Jan Thompson information, but I can only find audio or video clips, nothing in written word. For me that is u fortunate. I don’t hear so well, nor do I process spoken words as well as I once did. By the time I understand what someone is saying, I’ve missed what has been said since. Even with hearing aids I have trouble comprehending. I work best with written words, and I cannot find any from her.
              However, I am going to go out on a limb and say I am not feeling a connection to her. She may well be a very nice, compassionate person, but I feel problems with her presentations that turn me away. She is not attractive to me, not in appearance, and not in presentation. She may be the greatest person in the world, I am not about to deny her, but it does not interest me at the moment. If I could read about the experience itself, that is where we might connect. I just don’t know.

              Liked by 1 person

            10. aww, sorry to hear that, Rawgod! i did not know about your hearing issues. i’ll avoid sending you youtube links

              Liked by 1 person

            11. No problem. It’s just old age creeping up on me. A lot of videos have a transcribed add-on for people like me, but I cannot find anything on her site, or any other related site I looked at. I could label this ageism, or ableism, but really its not intentional, just people not realizing not everyone is as lucky as them. I think I was probably that way myself when I was younger.

              Liked by 1 person

            12. what i’ve observed, in my own life, is that when i wake up in a bad mood, i tend to experience crappy events during the entire day. it is a basic ‘spiritual law’, it is how we feel inside that determines our outer reality. similarly, you’ll notice when you’re in love, the whole world seems to look much brighter, agree?? that’s not because of the person we fell in love with, it’s because our inner feelings have changed.
              some people get addicted to that feeling, and go from relationship to relationship looking for it, not realizing it is only themselves that create that euphoria

              Liked by 3 people

            13. You have that correct, for the most part. But love dies unexpectedly. Someone smiles at you, and your bad mood fades away. 99% of your life can be within your control, but there is always something that can happen to change that. For me, the thing is to ride the waves, and try not to get caught up in the bullshit. I am not always successful, but I try to learn from the bad times. If I can see them coming, I can prepare at least somewhat.

              Liked by 1 person

            14. if it’s real love, it cannot die. that is the only thing of this world that lasts.

              as for control, don’t be under illusion that anything is under control. that’s what causes most misery for people. all happens on its own. we can only control our reaction to what occurs. yes, surfing skills are an excellent acquisition 🌊

              wishing you much health!

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            15. Real love may never die, in the cosmos, but that is debatable too. I have already met 5 so-called soul partners in this life alone. Me met, we loved, and still we parted ways. There are endings, and there are endings. What our futures hold we can never really know until we arrive there, and then it is the future no more.

              Liked by 1 person

  2. tis a tricky situation. Becky pointed out well all the confusion, uncertainty, fears that go along with it. it’s weirdly close to a sci-fi scenario, all the population being forced to take this ‘serum of liberation’. in my household, we’re suspicious of this experimental vaccine, and we’ll try to avoid it as long as possible. sorry to hear of the personal loss. may wellness stay with you and family

    Liked by 1 person

  3. You Stated — “The virus has found a foothold in the believers of religion and conspiracy”

    My Response — This statement is a bit lacking in scope. There is more nuance to the human condition.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in the poor of the world that both believers and non-believers have abandoned to their own fate. They have done this knowing very well that the virus will mutate in poor areas and bounce back in a different form later.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in the rich, who openly will not release the patents so the vaccines can be made in mass by other countries to protect our species. No concern whatsoever for the suffering and loss of millions.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in the religiously insane who use seatbelts to protect their children but leave rouge viruses in a special category.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in the conspiracy nuts that believe we never landed on the moon, princess Diana was fighting for 911 and that Lizard people are running the world.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in minority communities due to a very real history of being experimented on by racist monsters that thrive on hate and oppression. Monsters that still walk the Earth, fearless in the knowledge that they are fully safe feeding on their victims, in the light of day, while believers and non-believers alike stand by and give speeches on how things are going to change for the better someday.

    I would say the virus has found a foothold in our ability to simplify the complex to the point where we miss the truth of the full scope of our vulnerabilities.

    Just a thought

    Liked by 3 people

      1. To the contrary. I think the mass hysteria and tyrannical government overreach in response to a disease with a >99% recovery rate is quite real.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Well Ron, I don’t have any clue who to really believe, but my brother in law died from it and my father spent four days in the ICU and fully recovered after about 3 months. Just barely. I think it’s shitty that some people will just carry on as normal when they are symptomatic.

      Liked by 3 people

        1. “The one thing historically people need to realize that even if there is some asymptomatic transmission in all the history of respiratory-borne viruses any time asymptomatic transmission has never been the driver of outbreaks. The driver of outbreaks is always a symptomatic person. Even if there is a rare asymptomatic person that might transmit an epidemic is not driven by asymptomatic carriers.” ~ Anthony Fauci (circa late January 2020)

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      1. I don’t “believe” anything. I follow the empirical data. And that data consistently reveals that the risk is highest for the obese and those over 70 with multiple health problems, especially if they reside in nursing homes. For those who fall outside those two groups, there is little to fear.

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        1. I don’t “believe” anything. I follow the empirical data.”
          So you follow the same empirical data that led you to being fully vaccinated? The same data makers of competing factions trying to sway public opinion to control you into thinking one way or another? Do you believe the phizer data, AstraZeneca data, or the moderna data?

          Liked by 1 person

            1. So you do and don’t believe empirical data? I thought that empirical data was your gold standard. When does it no longer become experimental?

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            2. There is no empirical data to show the vaccines are safe or effective. That’s why the manufacturers websites carry a disclaimer, and the FDA approved them for emergency use.

              From the Pfizer “Fact Sheet”:

              “The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine is a vaccine and may prevent you from getting
              COVID-19. There is no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved vaccine to
              prevent COVID-19.”

              From the Moderna “Fact Sheet”:

              “The Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine is a vaccine and may prevent you from getting COVID-19.
              There is no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved vaccine to prevent COVID-19.”

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            3. It appears they have made enough “safe” vaccine that there is an element of trust.
              So, if FDA officially approves the vaccine would you be vaccinated?
              I’m suspecting some other trusted news is influencing your reaction.

              Liked by 1 person

            4. Yes. And that trusted news source is the Danish study that found “a higher than expected” death rate from blood clots in people aged 18-65 years of age in the first 28 days following the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine.

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            5. Perhaps. But I was, because my response to Jim specified why I would not be taking any of the experimental C-19 “vaccines” on offer.

              Liked by 1 person

            6. How many people have died if Covid around the world? How many people have died of blood clots related to a vaccine? There is no comparison!

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            7. 3.8 million, according to the WHO. That’s a tiny drop in the ocean in a world filled with 7.8 billion people. And the majority of those (94%, according to the CDC) died with COVID (i.e. due to other health complications, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, etc.) rather than because of COVID.

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            8. No. A calm and reasoned assessment of the facts is what matters, and the numbers do not support the pandemic narrative. The Black Death is estimated to have killed somewhere between 75 to 200 million people and reduced Europe’s population by 30 – 60%. COVID, OTH has killed less than 0.05% of the world’s population.

              Liked by 1 person

            9. It was a rhetorical question, Ron. Meant to demonstrate how much more dangerous the virus is than the cure. Nothing is 100% effective, but it is scientifically significantly safer to take the vaccine.

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            10. Ron, the whole thing about the validity (or not) of studies related to the virus and/or the vaccines carries the same weight as political ponderings. You either support what has been said … or you don’t.

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            11. I agree the trials were rushed, and they were not independent. But less people are dying with the vaccines than without them. Yes, ten years down the road we may have bad side affects, but that is ten years of life versus death.
              Meanwhile, people dying from blood clots caused by vaccines in minimal numbers in comparison to dying without the vaccines.
              And, we have another ten years to figure out the side effects, and if they are treatable. The odds are in favour of taking the vaccines, which I and my partner have already done. As it is, my family lack of longevity is already defying the odds. My family seldom lives into their seventies. I’ll be happy with whatever I get, even if it is tomorrow.

              Liked by 1 person

            12. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, doctors have seen more cases of blood clot-related conditions like deep vein thrombosis (DVT). It’s concerning because studies show that having a blood clot while you have the virus raises your chance of death by 74%.
              Elliott Richard Haut, MD, an associate professor of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is one of a group of doctors and researchers around the world who are trying to figure out the connection between DVT, pulmonary embolism (PE), and COVID-19.
              So, we’ve decided not to be vaccinated because of a 1 in 40,000 chance of increased DVT. Research shows that we find research to support our personal beliefs and opinions.

              Liked by 2 people

            13. it’s more of the long-term effects, that could not have possibly been predicted. and if that would occur, how could they even link it to the vaccine?
              of course, the mRNA could be safe, but we can’t deny that this is the first time it is used on general population, and some element of unknown is there

              Liked by 2 people

            14. No. We have decided not to be vaccinated because the vaccines have not been FDA-approved and we don’t wish to be guinea pigs for experimental drugs, especially given that we have no underlying health problems and we belong to an age group in which the risk of dying from COVID are extremely low.

              My body, my choice.

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      2. Jim, so sorry to hear about your family. This has been a difficult time for many people. I can definitely get why people are feeling confused.

        To share an example. my brother who is morbidly obese, and has a variety of health issues as well as some MH problems, contracted Covid. For him, it was like nothing more than a bad cold. Just about everyone in his small group home tested positive. No one was seriously impacted except for one of the care workers, a relatively, seemingly healthy young man in his thirties who ended up in the hospital. How can this be explained? My own son as well as his young kids contracted the virus. The kids were hardly impacted at all. They hardly even felt ill. For my son, it was like mild flu. He did lose his sense of taste and smell for a few weeks. That’s it.

        Other folks, some seemingly healthy end up at death’s door. I really think for many people this has something to do with the body’s inflammatory response, not just the virus itself. But, how do we predict this?

        For myself, I’m fully vaccinated and feel very confident at this point to go anywhere.

        But, I can also understand why there is vaccine hesitancy, especially among young people. They are at low risk, and no doubt have concern that there could be long-term risk connected with the vaccine that we just don’t know about yet. The time has been too short to be certain. It doesn’t help that there seems to have been this mixed messaging relating to mask-wearing for even people who are vaccinated.

        On the other hand, there are definitely long-term effects for some people who have contracted Covid as well. I think there’s still a lot of stuff that we don’t know. What if this really originated in the Wuhan lab after all?

        Liked by 3 people

        1. There are statistics and home-grown stories to fit every occasion, this virus included. I think for some, they prefer to stick to the old adage — better to be safe than sorry.

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        2. My brother in law was 60, generally healthy and an active craftsman. He was sick a couple of weeks before he was seen and he was in rapid decline. Neither he or my sister believed it was anything to worry about. We saw him on face time and told them to call 911 immediately. He looked bad. The medics intubated him but he was unable to recover after two weeks in the ICU. It may be nothing to some, but how do you know? Play it safe I guess.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I agree. I’m extremely glad that I’m vaccinated. I see it as a way to protect others and also like a passport to personal freedom. I did feel pretty miserable the day after the second dose, but after that, nothing. I was back to my normal self. I feel like everything in life contains an element of risk and uncertainty . We can only make the best decision possible based on the information at hand, and in my case give it to God. For me, getting the vaccine feels like a wise choice.

            Liked by 2 people

  4. My wife and I are both fully vaccinated. But we are both uneasy about mingling in public maskless. Especially the sort of public we have around here. Thick headed trumpanzees, stupid conspiracy wackos, believers of not just the big lie, but all of the other lies too. Gadsden flag flying, beer fueled, open carrying dipsticks who love jeebus, and hate the “others” who ain’t just like them.

    Yeah, I’m not going to trust these folks for a good long while yet. Probably never.

    We do have a small circle of friends/family that we have to trust in. I think most do. Let’s just keep doing that 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

      1. I live in small town Alberta, High Level to be exact (way up north) and the number of idiots up here is astounding. Alberta is full of rednecks anyway, but they are multiplying like mink. They obviously love their faces more than their lives.
        And just down the road is the small town of La Crete, a Mennonite supercenter. God is protecting them. Well, they say He is. He doesn’t seem to be doing much at all.

        Liked by 2 people

          1. No, it won’t. So I am trying to read between the lines. You said you live in a small city. My first thought was Nelson, but I was going to throw that out because to me it is a town. But googling cities in BC I find there are 52 small cities there, Nelson being one of them. So my top three choices of where you live are:
            Nelson
            Abbotsford
            or Grand Forks.
            How close am I?

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Williams Lake is a city now too? Oooooh, BC has a funny definition of city. By your standards High Level could be a city, except we don’t have a McDonald’s or a Starbucks. In fact, we don’t even have a mall, or a traffic light!

              Liked by 1 person

            2. Wow, it’s been a long time. Last time I passed through (late 70s, early 80s, it was like, I missed it cuz I blinked. I may have to pass that way again.

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            3. We do have KFC, though I much prefer POPEYE’S now. Possibly the busiest KFC in Canada, before Covid shut the NWT border. Everyone who is returning to Hay River or Yellowknife buys like 20 barrels to take home where they sell it cold for over $100 each. If they auction it off, it can ger as high as $200.

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            4. I just got knee braces and I am still learning to walk in them. I figure if I live long enough, I’ll need a scooter in a few more years. But I have to win the lottery first to be able to afford a new house to park it in, lol.

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            5. Oh, and you are lucky, you know, meant in a nice way. Two orthopedic srgeons told my my body was not worth the cost of knee replacements! So humane of them. I’m not sure if it’s because I’m Metis, or because I’m still a long-haired hippie freak…

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            6. We have KFC here, but much prefer A&W chicken. I guess if you can’t get something some people will pay anything when they can.

              I’m 74, my husband is 76, so yeah, the aging thing is not for sissies. He had his massive heart attack at age 42, & is still here, so that’s a positive. He does have COPD starting though.

              I am a cancer survivor as well….16 years now.

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            7. Mostly I do okay, healthwise. Diabetes, High blood pressure, pacemaker/defibrillator, arthritis, glaucoma, sleep apnea, no colon even. Still, I smile and laugh every day. I still have my longterm memory most of the time. Shortterm, not so good anymore.

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            8. Probably both together. They were both White Christian Males. If I told them I was atheist, that would have clinched it. Maybe I have a stylized A on my forehead Christians can see.

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            9. My lack of belief, to put it nicely, comes out mostly when some Christianwants to pray for me, and I tell them they have no right to do so. Otherwise, while I do not hide it, I don’t exactly broadcast it either.. Except on WP, where such things are a welcome topic of discussion.

              Liked by 1 person

    1. Shelldigger, I have some friends that feel the same way. They are fully vaccinated but are fearful to go out in public, maskless. I feel awful for them.

      But, if the vaccine is truly effective at preventing serious illness and hospitalization, why be afraid.? It seems to me that it is the unvaccinated who have placed themselves at some risk, but not really the other way around.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. …because the vaccine isn’t 100 %. It’s a little over 90%. They say, that even if you catch it and you are vaccinated, it should soften the blow of the illness, and maybe you will not be able to spread it to others.

        There are too may if-s and maybe-s, to make me happy.

        Some people who aren’t vaccinated show NO symptoms of covid. They go on their blissfully ignorant, merry way, hugging everyone they dearly love. Think about that for a minute. How would you feel if you found out that was you?

        I sure as hell would never be able to forgive myself for passing covid to someone, and they died from it.

        A lot of blissfully ignorant dumbasses don’t seem to care.

        This isn’t over yet. It looks like we may be over the hump, but it isn’t time to hit a packed movie theater just yet IMO.

        I have been getting a little more lax in mask wearing. Small businesses with just a few employees and not a heavy customer load, like my local lumbershed/hardware store, where I know the people who work there are vaccinated, I might go in there maskless. But a packed Wal Mart on a Friday night? I’m masking up.

        Indoor concerts, movie theaters, chuch services (as if,) weddings, packed beaches, anywhere large groups of people are living it up, I’m not going, or masking up to briskly walk past. I’m not going there yet.

        I can’t trust the people around here to even remotely attempt to do the right thing. So I have to be extra careful doing my part, to be a responsible human being.

        I live in the redneck, beer swilling, sister chasing, jeebus loving, gun packing, trumpanzee land. I generally don’t want to interact with these morons when a freaking pandemic isn’t raging through the land. Let alone now.

        Again, I can not trust them to do the right thing. I don’t think you can afford to either. look at the people around you and ask yourself, “can I trust them with both my, and my families health and welfare?” When you can answer that with an honest “yes,” get back to me 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        1. Well, Shelldigger, it’s a mess and confusing for many people. I happen to be part of a church where many feel as you do. I certainly don’t mind if others wear a mask if they are feeling unsafe and uncomfortable. That’s down to everyone’s choice.

          But, I feel like I’m fully vaccinated and perfectly safe. Yet, I’m also forced to wear this mask if I plan on attending in-person services. I feel miserable. The thing is sticking to my face in the heat. My glasses are fogged. Can’t sing. And, from my perspective, it’s all coming from a fear perspective, not from science or the CDC recommendation at all. We already have limited capacity and maintain social distancing as an added precaution. The sanctuary is disinfected with a fogging machine. I”m not kiddin.

          I’m so ready for this to end. I definitely need grace and patience. Ironically, church is the only place where I’ve had to wear a mask since the mandate was lifted by the CDC.

          Well, like I said, we just need to hang in here longer with each other. But, I’m feeling frustrated. Just being honest. Be safe.

          Liked by 2 people

            1. I can see your point, Atheist. Count my blessings to be healthy and alive rather than to stress over these face coverings. And, I really do understand that the church leadership means the best and is just being careful out of an abundance of care and caution. This will eventually pass. Anyway, going back into blog hibernation. 😊

              Liked by 1 person

      2. Vaccinés are not 100% effective, Becky. I have had two shots of Pfizer, but I and my spouse still wear masks. One thing, the variants out there are not afraid of the vaccines. The other is I am immunocompromised, I catch anything that comes within ten feet of me, not just six. Since I started wearing a mask, I have had no flus, or colds. First winter ever in my life I was not sick once. I will keep the mask on for the rest of my life if I have to. I could get to like not being confined to bed for weeks at a time.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. Interesting. I can recall saying to an ardent believer, “I am 100% certain there is a god.” What I should have said was, “I am 100% certain I want there to be a god.” At the time, I did.

    While I now mostly avoid saying that I’m sure there is not any god, at times I do say it just to see what happens. As it turns out, I only seem to stir up peeps who claim to be uniquely agnostic.

    I find the foolishness about disease disturbing. This is religious people doing harm in the name of either religion or their favorite scape goat, God, or Jesus if you prefer. No matter my beliefs about gods or religion, none of my thinking has ever changed regarding disease, science, or medicine. It’s just that now I needn’t work any kind of reconciliation or justification between my religion and my opinions.

    You can still be a good (insert a religion) and exercise, eat well, avoid infecting others, not deny scientific medical advice, and generally be pro-healthy-life.

    Liked by 3 people

            1. What have they done in context to a deadly virus that indicates that they are “sane”? What is the evidence of their sanity via what they have done in relation to the virus?

              I’m curious as to why they have received this particular label from you.

              Liked by 1 person

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