How We Evolved to Belief—

How in our evolution did we become so trusting while raised in societies of liars.

Hard to dispute that belief is a common thread of war, contention, oppression, division, and hate, but I’d have to take two minutes to prove it. Seein’s I only get a minute here, godspeed is of the essence. To scrutinize and thoroughly plow-over any belief based faith is a noble and quite moral thing to do—and easy…

There are those that claim to have found god in their dreams, visions, NDEs, traumas, addictions, and so forth. He’s also been found in G-force testing, neurological studies, chemical enhancements, CO poisoning, anesthesia, seizures, end-zones, and outright lies. This spectral evidence (except for the lying, of course) is the root of all faith, and beliefs based on such evidence are totally unreliable and 100% subjective. To believe them has caused pain and suffering and outright murderous genicide throughout religions storied past. Putting all religion into past-tense would actually be wise—based on its performance…its own demonstrable evidence.

Humanity’s beauty is our obligatory nature to our fellows in-kind, basically feeling compelled to believe when presented nearly anything—to be compliant, agreeable, simply because we are asked to merely believe and trust. Belief is about the stupidest trait mankind has somehow maximally developed in a society of liars.

To believe based on another’s belief statement, who also heard it from another, who never witnessed anything— is not only foolish, but irresponsible.

Where in our evolution and why, did we become so believing, so trusting, yet raised in a predominantly dishonest society of liars? Raised in deception like it’s a running joke of some kind, how this serves our survival—I just don’t know.

In a nutshell—“if the existence of God is up for debate, he doesn’t exist. Belief/faith in something is not necessary if that something actually exists”Ben

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

84 thoughts on “How We Evolved to Belief—”

  1. Being willing to be found wrong is not a character flaw. There should be a celebrated place in our processing of information for being found wrong. An award for what being mistaken can bring in that enviable moment of clarity called an epiphany that puts you back on the correct express. Think how embarrassing it is to sing the wrong lyrics or misquote Hamlet. Well no more. Being found wrong makes you better informed and engaged in meaningful honest conversation.

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    1. What a great analogy. How can we get passed the norms of belief when we embarrass over singing the wrong key, or word. Embracing our inquiry and attempts regardless of opinions is huge. I like throwing out my ideas for all to see and scrutinize. Wished I’d found that confidence at a younger age.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Well it appears that what may have been a beneficial survival tool is no longer necessary in the same apples to apples settings, But the mind keeps using it. What I see now is what children need to be taught about predators is now never taught until it’s too late. We don’t want to traumatize them with tmi, and we leave them vulnerable and replace it with religious belief. If you employ faith to protect your kids it is not going to end well.

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  2. I guess I don’t find belief that hard to understand in terms of why we have it. Reading The Believing Brain by Michael Shermer had a big influence on that I suppose. It’s good book for explaining why we believe. In short we simply never would have survived without it.

    Rationally investigating takes time. Time is a luxury, one that as humans we do not always have. If you hear a rustle in the bush, it’s possible it can be any number of things, but if there is a 5% chance of it being a lion, then you are better off believing that it is a lion and running like hell. Simply put there is too much information to know in a lifetime that one must accept what people say on faith. And this is especially true for children who, until a certain age, don’t have the same reasoning ability and are more defenseless. Believing what adults say is paramount to their survival, even though this makes them also vulnerable to exploitation. But I believe exploitation in our hunter-gatherer past would not have been prevalent like it is in our “civilized world”. In a tribe everybody knows everybody and intentional manipulation of children would have not been a thing you’d want to do, given you’d know the parents, and those kids would grow up to be part of the tribe and had to be functional and useful. In general the desire to grift our fellow tribes person, young or old would have been small.

    You, yourself believe many things. You have never gone back through historical records to make sure George Washington was the first president of the U.S. If I tell you something about how climate works you would likely believe me as an expert in that area. And it would be rational to do so give you cannot do every experiment yourself, or read every book, every journal article, etc. We must at some point trust in expertise, but it’s important to know what that really means, and also understand how expertise is achieved. There is no expertise when it comes to religion. The divine is a fiction and nobody can know more about it than anyone else. Nobody is arriving at new answers or proofs of the existence of the supernatural. It’s all still at ground zero. All they’ve gotten better at is exploiting our cognitive biases to convince people of their worldview. And I am sure in the past somebody like a clergyman was more educated, could read, and had more “expertise” and thus was more likely to be trusted as authority on many subjects. I am sure even further back things like simply being older and more experienced, being particularly talented at strategy or combat gave one some authority and air of “expertise”. What such people said was taken more seriously. And I am sure many were responsible with that trust, others were not. The same is true today. We still are presented with a large volume of information in which we are going to have to believe some and be skeptical of others to the point where we are going to investigate deeper. But that requires the luxury of time, and some people, even today don’t have that. And even if they did have the leisure time maybe it is better for them to just have fun with friends and family rather than investigate the truth behind their religious beliefs. Because leisure is also important to our well-being.

    Belief kept us alive evolutionarily speaking, and is still an important part of how we’re able to function today.

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    1. I think a key here is you are an expert in climate, for the sake of climate science. Not to convince me there is a deity, but to understanding climate. That is where religion has hijacked reason. I don’t have to believe you, but I do trust you have no motive to control me. Therein lies the difference. Motive. Between you, Robert, and Victoria’s video (Thomson)? This is making sense. I’m sure you’ve seen the video I’m guessing, but what an friggin insightful line of reasoning. Our ability to imagine what lay in the grass is also our religious trapping.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I don’t think all religious leaders have a motive of control…many are simply controlled in the same way and see their world view as the normal one. Like I said, I think when it comes to expertise we have to understand how expertise is arrived at, and what it really means to be an expert. And for religion there really is no such thing. It’s like being a Middle-Earth expert…well you can know about as much as you can from Tolkein’s writing, but in the end it’s not real should you attempt to prove it so.

        Comedian Bill Burr gives a very similar criticism when it comes to religion. He’s like I don’t know if there is a God or not, but I can’t get over the fact that the person telling me there is one, is just some guy, no different than anybody else.

        Either way, I don’t think belief is something we are going to grow out of anytime soon, but through education, learning better critical thinking skills and what our cognitive biases are we can make better decisions about who to believe who not to believe.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Religion imo, has tried to replace our natural instinct with words of warning comfort that actually don’t protect us from predators. Through faith we become vulnerable and trust in “god” to protect our kids and congruently withhold real information because it’s a difficult reality to impress upon young minds. . Young victims all too often only become aware of what predators do, after the assault. The catholic priests have relied on this naivety for centuries.

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          1. To suggest that religion is the only way vulnerable people can be predated on, I think is false. Child molesters can exploit that trust through more ways than just religion.

            It’s also true that there are many people who are comforted by religion and many religious leaders again that have the best of intentions. Of course it is true that there are better ways to comfort and there are more meaningful things to study to really know how to help people in effective ways. Religion even with the best of intentions falls well shy of more honest attempts to finds answers for the ills we face as individuals and as a society.

            Remember not all theists necessarily find a disconnect between faith and curiosity. Many scientists historically have been theists as well, and of course many scientists today are as well. One can still believe in God and be egalitarian, kind, and curious.

            Liked by 1 person

        2. I posted this above to Nan, but I hoped you’d see it. “I had another question, if Swarn is right, why is belief in an unknown, a reason to ostracize over unbelief? Why do we lose our friends if we don’t believe? Anyone?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Not all theists ostracize one for unbelief.

            But hell I lost some friends because of Trump. I think religion feeds our tribalism, because ultimately that’s what it was for. Being bound together through a name of a region, or skin color isn’t the only way to enhance feelings of tribalism. Religion influences ones entire worldview, and thus leaving religion to the person who hasn’t left would seem to like a game changer I’m sure. Religion tends to incorporate more than just one’s view of taxes. But again this is at the extremes and really only for your Judeo-Christian religions. Most Hindus couldn’t give a shit that you aren’t Hindu.

            But I do also think there is something more visceral going on. As you’ve learned about dopamine and beliefs, you know that beliefs get very much entrenched in or brains and reinforcing those beliefs releases dopamines. Having a strong emotional attachment to someone who used to share your beliefs but now doesn’t has to be to some degree a very uncomfortable feeling physically, because your emotions for that person actually would force you to think differently and your brain doesn’t want to do that. It wants more dopamine. Just like it’s not easier to read or respond to arguments that contradict your point of view…it has to be to some degree easier just to not associate with some you care for who views the world as completely different. I doubt it’s easy either way.

            I also wonder if people who are so programmed by religion are able to feel emotional attachment and show genuine feeling in the same way. In a way religion gives some very superficial reasons to be connected to the people around you. It may be easier to sever that connection simply because I imagine one suppresses a lot of one’s own feelings with Christianity. As my conversations with Victoria have revealed Christianity in particular teaches you that your own thoughts, that your own self is sinful by nature and that you have to lose that to be one with God. One wonders how that factors in them really letting themselves feel about their other human beings. The behavior of white evangelicals in the south would seem to support the idea that selfishness is more prevalent than empathy for their fellow human.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. But again this is at the extremes and really only for your Judeo-Christian religions. Most Hindus couldn’t give a shit that you aren’t Hindu.

              Many Jews hate the phrase “Judeo-Christian” because it usually just means Christian. I think this is one of those perfect examples.

              Most Jews in my experience would feel pretty much the same way as Hindus on this matter. They could care less if you aren’t Jewish or whether you believe in God or not.

              To address the bigger issue that Jim raised, it’s pretty normal and frequent to have atheist Jews within the larger Jewish community. They are still seen as part of the community and usually have a somewhat different relationship than most deconverts from Christianty have with Christianity. Although this can differ a little from person to person.

              Liked by 2 people

            2. Fair point. I agree that most Jews don’t really care either, although there are certainly orthodox Jews, and it seems that even if they often don’t subscribe to the theology, culturally they want their kids to marry Jews and continue practices. So certainly there is some ostracizing going on, but certainly not because people don’t hold to a theistic worldview.

              Judeo-Christian is still the normal word to use to describe the root of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, but if you can give me a handier word I’ll start using it. No sarcasm intended. I get why Jews wouldn’t like the term.

              Liked by 1 person

            3. I think it’s fine to use Judeo-Christian in some contexts, but it should make sense.

              If someone said, “I want to talk about Western culture’s roots in the Judeo-Christian tradition . . .” I wouldn’t really have a problem with that necessarily. I think it’s when we get to more specific statements. Let’s say, “Religions of the Judeo-Christian type believe we are all flawed and sinners.” That is really more of a Christian idea than a Judeo-Christian one.

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            4. But isn’t it a very Islamic idea as well. Usually when I’m referring to Judeo-Christian religions I am referring to Christianity and Islam given how similar they are with their messiah and heaven and hell narrative.

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  3. Hi:-) Why have humans evolved to trust themselves? There is little evidence as to why anyone one of us should do that. Everyone thinking they are not biased or less biased than everybody else. When in reality we cannot escape our own observations. A unique space time where we are always in the center of the universe, observing matter into existence and time-travelers with our senses. Everybody picks and chooses in order to live. Bringing our whole selves with every aspect into question is not beneficial for survival, and devastating in terms of mental health. Who wants to deal with hidden agendas in their sub conscience? Add group-thinking into it; also beneficial for survival. In evolution you were more vulnerable to predators and more likely to starve without the protection of a tribe. Humans are hard-wired to lie, for nothing separates that from confirmation bias other than the absence of awareness of deceit.

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    1. I think the key to growing through this phase is coming. There are people that are much less biased than others when they become aware of that tendency through genuine curiosity. Here’s where I believe the difference lay—motive. Learning evolution or physics for the sake of understanding them is much much different than learning evolution or physics for the purpose of proving your religious beliefs. That, is bias with a premise!! Certainly I have to trust/believe scientists to continue the chain of advancement—Building block by block. However, religion is still at ground zero. Nobody knows any more than anyone else does but when one wants to use science to advance religion, that—is bias. It’s motive. My curiosity to learn is not governed by a our evolution. Religion is the byproduct of our past. When people become truly curious, they become atheists. When they become curious to for the intent of proving religion (I’m not crazy, I can prove it) it is the ultimate in cognitive dissonance. The top of the scale.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I LIKE this — However, religion is still at ground zero. Nobody knows any more than anyone else does

        That “ground zero” sums it up perfectly. Even though the world and people have changed immensely over the ages, “the story” remains the same. Believers claim that’s the point, but for those who have “evolved,” it becomes a non-issue.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. I had another question, if Swarn is right, why is belief in an unknown, a reason to ostracize over unbelief? Why do we lose our friends if we don’t believe? Anyone?

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I think the reasons “why” are many and varied, but part of it is because in the case of Christianity, believers are told to have nothing to do with unbelievers if they won’t accept “the gospel.”

            And if anyone will not receive you or listen to your words, shake off the dust from your feet when you leave that house or town. (Matthew 10:14, ESV)

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            1. Ah yes… and if you are familiar with the social implications of that scripture in the original, “shake the dust off your feet” is a serious damn you all to hell attitude. I forgot that. Glad your here!

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      2. I will leave you with love

        It is all that I have got

        A pauper in my tracks

        With such a simple life-hack

        I will leave you with love

        It is all that I have got

        To me it is a great treasure

        Impossible to ever measure

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I think it’s plainly evident that we humans – especially our younger, inexperienced selves – crave simplicity and purity in a world full of complexity and nuance. It’s an easier process, and it frees us to pursue personal enjoyment. Ask any group of people if they’d prefer to spend years of intensive scientific study to discover the origin of the cosmos, or if they’d rather spend one hour a week in church and the rest of their leisure time having fun. We all know the answer.

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    1. I think you’re right, But I think most grow into that scientist, but also do not pursue it because of convenience. When did I become a skeptic? When my curiosity engaged and I started to observe things the way they actually function. The implications of your comment here could be a book Rob. Our evolution is lagging behind our abilities to problem solve and our brains are still stuck on the residual savannah. Our ability to imagine other worlds/realms/states is a byproduct of cognitive mechanisms designed for other purposes, hijacked by religion.

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  5. Brains are tricky things. So is belief. It is hard to parse out what is what. However, in my belief system, I do sense the Gods as Other.

    But you are correct – field testing is imperative. What is yourself as a sock puppet telling yourself divine things? What is the self and what is the Other? Christianity frowns from field testing, as if it is something dirty and evil. How else do you test what is being told to you? Having a belief system means asking lots of questions and testing.

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    1. But, if your field test gives you results un-synced with the teaching—employ more faith until one essentially brainwashes themselves through desire and repetition. While belief in itself is tricky to. Why? Why is it deemed so important to merely believe…anything?

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      1. It is not important to believe in anything. I think that people who do not believe in anything threaten those who do. I am not threatened but it sounds like the Christians you write about do. I believe that it is a choice. If you believe, then you can unbelieve. If you unbelieve, you can believe. But if you have no choice, then you can’t know what is possible.

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    1. I do remember this part as a believer. It’s also lazy, but the inclination to trust the outcomes after deciding to have faith, really spoils the rest of your mind from open discovery. Everything links to Jesus, and it becomes one-sided and soiled, learning from a poisoned well of belief, often pouring the poison in ourselves through faith

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  6. Jim,

    You sometimes remind me of one of those students in my classromm, the one that has 100 questions, but honestly is a true educator’s DREAM STUDENT!!! You know the one I’m referring to? 😉 “Curiosity” is 97% of the time one of a person’s and humans, as a highly evolved species (yes, I know technically “highly evolved” is relative and clearly has exceptions! 😛 ), best traits! Curiosity juices, fuels progress! And then 3% of the time it is dangerous, a risky trait if you are a cat! Hahahaha!

    Faith in a Belief is more times than not pure laziness. Those are the types used car salesmen CRAVE to walk on to their lots in droves. They are bank accounts with no security guards, no deposit-box locks or keys, and tellers or bank Vice Presidents who NEVER ask for any photo ID’s when whomever wants to make a large withdrawal!!!! Do you know the types I’m talking about? 🤭

    Anyway Jim, you sure do ask a LOT of great, provocative questions!!! ❤

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Ya know boss (and you’ve been here since the beginning) it’s been one huge realization after another of the thorough, grass-roots duping religion has pulled on humanity. I am close to seeing the complete picture of this, but it’s almost too much to keep track of. I notice Ben is having quite the unfolding lately as well. I remember his trepidation at first, luke warm, but now seeing wide eyed the thorough top to bottom contradiction of religion to reality. It’s incredible. Every jot and tittle. Thanks for the grand compliment sir.

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      1. Indeed. But we both know — because we’ve both been there, done it — when those Rose-colored glasses, supersonic earbuds/earphones, and “Scriptures” (with and without contextual translation-anomalies and variations that do and DON’T get mentioned at the bottom or in the margins) that have fine, FINE print throughout… are all permanently fixed!!! 😮 None of it ever comes off, not even in the showers or tubs! LOL 😛

        Just like the outstanding, provocative, mind-opening 1998 film Pleasantville, until the glasses, earbuds, and incomplete, amputated, misleading “Stories” are temporarily(?) removed, it’s is near impossible to realize the exhaustive duping extent. Right? It’s similar to like trying to get out of the Mafia if you’ve been inside it all your life. 😉

        Liked by 4 people

            1. You’ll probably LOVE the uncanny imagery and simile to “You don’t need to ask anymore questions, travel anywhere else, when everything you could EVER WANT… is right here.

              (and then Jim asks…)

              But how can I know what I don’t want until I experience it and then decide? 🤔

              Suddenly the Teacher becomes the Student.

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            2. Bingo. But don’t just have faith in that… go see for yourself how far is “keep going”! 😉 I think you’ll find you WON’T fall off the edge of a flat Earth created 6,000 years ago. If you catch a large Princess Cruise-liner… you’ll end up where you started, just a lot wiser and MOST CERTAINLY NOT the same man. ❤

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            3. I’m always up for a good adventure. Remember—Never quit, die trying, love everyone—never surrender! I’ve heard there’s places a man has never stood. I think I’ll be first thank you but remember, the road home has forks in it too.

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            4. Couldn’t have said it better. And you are firing up my Explorer “Marco Polo/Mark Watney” vicarious sides Jim! Watch out! I may come kidnap you from your lovely wife and take you as my Highly Willing Prisoner to go stand in… unstanded/unstandable places! 😆 Find forks… as well as spoons, knives, and hopefully not Alien ET’s that use huge black-kettles to boil and cook their naive Earthling Men who remind them of the Neanderthals they use to always easily catch with one wave of a Budweiser can!

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            5. I wish, but once I start scratchin dirt on the rails about Oklahoma? My skids’ll be duller than uncle hanks two year old toothpick. Unless of course I drag my ass to dfw by greyhound (no shower four days) should be a cherry time. Any Roman Baths on the OKTX border?

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            6. Roman-style baths on the Red River? Umm, legal ones or unscrupulous ones with complimentary women and/or men of “the Evening” and a delicious “breakfast bar”???? And I’m not saying that I know or don’t know any of these establishments at all… legal or illegal. 😈

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            7. Remember… we are on the FRINGE of the Bible-belt here! All of us God-fearin’ folk have one lifestyle that is public in daylight, and another that is…

              …less public and nocturnal, with a bunch of church-going guys in white hoodies with eye-holes we can’t see out of, flaming torches, and 7th-grade edge-e-cations. So I can’t say a whole lot. 😉

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            8. Alright, I can’t help myself. Sorry. I promise this will be my last shenanigan. 😉

              See, Missippee is just a flaming cross-throw over the river. This is how we do it here…

              I kid you not Jim, we STILL have plenty of god-fearin’ folk like this. LOL

              Liked by 1 person

      2. When I first started here, I was having doubts and I was just barely beginning to see the light of truth. I tried to be honest with myself but at the same time I was hoping I was wrong so I could still have faith. I found that the only way I could have maintained my belief would have been to deny truth and completely close my eyes to it all. When you are honest with yourself and earnestly seek the truth, you will find it. The ones who are not being honest with themselves and don’t care about the truth are those who still have “faith.”

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        1. Or those who have not yet field tested the promises of scripture. If one honestly evaluates the inefficacy and non-results of all the promises to believers without all the hair splitting excuse, you then have sure knowledge it’s a hoax. It is by faith one stays in, and by fact that one leaves. Those that stay only know the words, which is the vast majority of internet apologetístas

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  7. I’m not sure when my normal (as in born with) credulity morphed into skepticism as I learned (if I did). But even today I feel surprised when lied to. Years ago, we had a saying: ‘It’s your fault. You fucked up. You trusted me.’ Writing this, I ended up in a rabbit hole reading about famous lies in history, of which there are SO many. I did. Trust me.

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    1. Credulity is a great summary Bill. I need a neologism combining it with gullibility. And most people practice this craft on their children from day one. It’s natural in modern society…but what’s the benefit? I know indigenous tribes were superstitious, but were they lying about everything, or I wonder if this is a more modern problem. A mans word was his bond…or was it? Ever?

      Like

      1. Good! I would but I’ve loaned my copy. But I will give you the info from the back cover as listed on Amazon which perfectly explains what this book is about – “How did mythology and religion first being? Where did the ideas of “God”, “spirit and soul” come from? The author takes us to ancient times, showing us how early humans struggled to make sense of the world around them. Drawing on history, geology, volcanology, anthropology, chemistry, astronomy, archaeology, oceanography, biology and cognitive science, the author reveals the surprising true meaning of our most sacred stories. Bill Lauritzen is some kind of genius.
        Sir Arthur C. Clark

        Another good read would be “why we believe in god(s) by J. Anderson
        Thomson, Jr. MD

        Liked by 2 people

            1. I will watch it! I haven’t seen it, but even if I had I should see it again. I know you…I just did the first five minutes. I like already!!!!

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            2. It’s amazing how much we begin to see when the limbic fog has lifted. Initially, I was so embarrassed to admit that I had once had such a deep belief. I needed to understand. After diligent research into the whys and the hows, I was astonished at the findings.

              It’s been almost 2 decades since I deconverted from Christianity, and I continue to learn more about the complexities of belief. It’s all so fascinating and sobering.

              Liked by 1 person

            3. This is truly fascinating and answers a lot of my questions. Thank you. I am going to watch it again ASAP. I’ve used the term hijacked in several post. Our natural inclinations have been usurped by religion. They want us to believe it comes from them, but this trust is hijacked from our evolved survival mechanisms. Thank again Victoria. Everyone please watch!!

              Like

        1. Susi, it’s good to see you here on Jim’s blog. I was a bit concerned how you would react when you visited my blog to view my haiku contributions. Seems we’re all in one accord. 👍

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  8. I always felt that we started believing because someone had this idea which perfectly filled a void which worked for others too and slowly one by one joined this system because they did not want to be left alone as an outcast. You believe in something different? You’re always alone and criticized.

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    1. I get your point and agree, but that void you speak of is often only an issue because someone pointed it out. Were it not for for that? Not just any belief, but unshakable, strong and proud belief. That’s American Bible Belt fundamentalism that dominates the religious circuit.

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      1. Exactly! If someone showed another way, things would’ve been different. When there’s something happening and you have no idea what it is but you have to explain how it happened to people, that’s when miracle comes into the picture. You have no idea all of this came into existence but want to look like you know it all? Create something which created all these things and lo! You’re the messenger.

        Liked by 3 people

  9. Nice post Jim. That quote at the end was brilliant. 🙂

    Seriously though. This idea of faith has run its course and we need to move on to bigger and better things. Dwelling on and debating things unseen, unprovable and completely without any evidence whatsoever is ridiculous…yet so many of us are or have been guilty of it.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Sure, we’ve all been tricked into taking sides at one time or another and convinced somehow by liars that that belief is important, and what flavor you believe is important too. Makes no sense. Why why why? Lo no se…And your right! That quote at the end was brilliant. Must’ve been a different Ben…

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