Reasoning With Resonance

How reason tells us there is only life

Spending a lot of time and years searching for meaning, wondering, worrying, sometimes hoping life lasts and lasts, while other times wishing it was over, takes up a lot of our thought-time here in the earthly—don’t let life pass you by searching for meaning over having experience You won’t find it. You are it.

We certainly can be entertained by the search. The philosophy is quite good to hear and read, but where does it go? What good is knowing your future or understanding past, your hopes shifted here and there by a little dose of some neat words?

Tomorrow is as uncertain as the past (what we can remember of it) and was a state of mind that’s no longer me, but will be accountable for in the Christian hereafter. Maybe I’ll get Alzheimer’s and forget the wrongs I’ve done before I go to die, what then? Is there a dividing line?

We can’t see the supernatural because we are the supernatural. We are a ripple in the extension of galaxies, an antennae, a presence of convergence in the fabric of space and energy. When we meditate and perceive what seems to be another world, are merely glimpses into our past and timeless future. Like a fish seeing the water and being in awe, we too cannot perceive the baseline of our existence which is space (we are made of it) which is life itself.

We. Are. It. We are not I as we typically think of. We cannot find the meaning of our existence because we are the meaning of our existence. Through our lens the universe, us, views itself unknowing the vastness we call space, is we. It is so obvious we cannot imagine life with it or without it.

Abandon the father figure of god that is so ingrained in our western culture, for “god” is merely a co-op, a dispensary of source energy, consciousness, that very concept that eludes us is indeed the mystery. We could not know the darkness without the light, nor peace without the turmoil, heaven without the hell. We exist unable to comprehend our opposite because “I am that I am”.

We cannot imagine what life was like before we were born. Nor can we accept that death is the total end, and at that moment would be as though we never were. To posit an end means we had a beginning. We cannot envision a beginning or an end—we are incapable of it because we always have been.

Author: jim-

One minute info blogs breaking the faith trap.

52 thoughts on “Reasoning With Resonance”

  1. There is a theory that I have (though I will not likely write about in my blog) that coincides fairly well with this post. Basically, it’s the belief that everything ultimately comes from energy itself, based on the fact that throughout all of time and space as we know it, the only observable, measurable constant within all things has been energy. Even all cognitive processes can be broken down into a series of energy transfers on the most basic levels.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are two things basically that are just unknown. I suspect they are related, possibly even one in the same. I’m betting on on field theory as a source of gravity and the mind of consciousness. I actually may even live to see it as we are now on pace to double advances every ten years, instead of hundreds. Quantum computing may be the nail in the religious coffin. Imagine all the new space for museums!! Here’s to hoping 🍻

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I get the travel bug now and then. Especially when someone friggin teases me with pictures and descriptions of cool places. Thank a lot. Jerk. Hehe.

          Like

  2. People are so strange sometimes. The same brains that developed the computer also believe in ghosts. The same brains that developed vaccines that saved the lives of tens of millions of people came up with the anti-vax conspiracy garbage flooding social media. The same brains that sent robot explorers to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and out past the edge of the solar system, think the earth is only a few thousand years old and that it was created by some old dude in a robe and a beard with a perverted interest in our sex lives. Even someone as utterly brilliant as Linus Pauling slipped into the realm of the irrational with his claims that vitamins could cure cancer, unwilling to accept the fact that his evidence was faulty.

    What is it about these strange brains of ours that makes us both so brilliant and so gullible at the same time? Why are so many people willing, even eager, to grasp for the irrational?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I take that as a thumbs down? Haha. Yes sir. The same brains that have calculated the amount of raw energy in a cubic centimeter of space, are the same brains that decided to go into farming. It just never ends the irrational behavior of humans. Hehe. Great comment grouchy. We all best be careful out there not to get suckered. It’s amazing we’ve gone anywhere as gullible as humans can be. Wanna see my puppy?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. This is very true. Seems the human mind can have a difficult time either telling truth from fantasy or figuring out the best way to go about finding the difference.

      Fantasy seems to be a huge thing and not just in religion. There are tens of thousand crazy unprovable and outright incorrect things that people believe wholeheartedly.

      That alone would be worth a research study.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I’m sure there are research studies about this kind of thing. I remember Jim mentioning several since I began following his blog. There are evolutionary reasons why we are the way we are. I know I have to be cautious myself with some of this stuff or I find myself falling into the same fallacies that I scoff at in other people. Especially when it comes to things I have an interest in. I hate string theory, for example. The math is ridiculously complex. Someone told me once that only about a dozen people in the world can really grasp what’s going on. Apparently large parts of it cannot be proven or disproven experimentally, so we just have to take it on faith that they’re right. And worst of all, it’s inelegant. So I find myself latching onto attempts to disprove it with glee, even though I know that they’re probably wrong and string theory is right. Maybe. Although I hope not.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. String theory is simple, actually. As a kid I used to collect pieces of binder twine around the thrashing machine (is that telling my age?) and I learned, without any advanced math, that the more strings you tied together, the longer would be the string in your pocket, or bucket, and if you braided these, you could make quite useful ropes. String theory, in a nutshell. I read somewhere that string theory isn’t actually “string” but “strings” theory, which reinforced my own observations. I’m off to write my thesis.

          Liked by 2 people

  3. Would it be partially correct to interpret this post as written by a “deist” rather than an atheist? It’s difficult to get a good picture of hardhack, isn’t it. I always end up having to use saturation to make the colour come out in mine.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That is a tough pic. I would guess this could be written by a deist, but my exercise and exploration can’t really assign a god to the whole project, not yet anyway nor would it make a difference. I would lean more towards the universe being a brute fact and we are an expression of itself. If there had to be a god title of assignment, it is us. Is there a head honcho running the show? Maybe. I remember in Contact, with Jodi Foster when she met her dad during the drop, he said “this is just the way it’s always been”. I think the infatuation with god turns me off a bit. Everyone’s doing god by default tradition but I never would have thought that on my own.
      Some of my writing here is exploratory, and because I value the input from people like you and others, I sometimes present my ideas as ideas. These are not believed by me… yet. I may, but requires no god I don’t think.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re right. The term “deist” was incorrect on my part. Nowhere is a deity or ‘god’ mentioned, just what I’d call transcendence. I was so heavily indoctrinated in Christianity, even as a child ever prepared to be a martyr for my faith that my brain retains that image, probably forever. I wouldn’t give my life for God or any such power now, but the sense of being utterly responsible for, and a full part of “Life” remains. Maybe that’s what drove people originally to invent the god concept: they felt beholden to a greater whole, a life-giving force that fed them and gave them love, and children. How do we say ‘thank you’ to something like that but by stating, without equivocation, you gave me life and now I give it back to you… however we conceive of “you” except that religion usurped the context and enslaved people’s minds with its Big Lie. I never wanted to be religious, I just needed to be part of something bigger and definitely better, than myself; something that would always be there to correct me, to keep me from “evil,” in particular egotistical pride, as I had a few brain cells that were dangerously high functioning… Seems to me, after reconsideration, that your post addresses that issue of belonging, or being a living, necessary part of this greater whole.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I certainly see how it could have been interpreted either way. I was heavily indoctrinated too and I get caught (catch myself) thinking in Christian too. Thank you though, for clarifying.
          I think you’ll find this true, that If we cling to belief in God, we cannot likewise have faith, since faith is not clinging but letting go.

          Liked by 1 person

            1. These are slugs I have for future posts. Try this one too. It’s a little simpler—Faith is clinging to something weaker than yourself out of uncertainty

              Like

            2. I have no problem with that one: I discovered that truth many years ago when I said, OK, out goes “faith, hope and love” (1st Cor. 13:13) No more of that disempowering BS, I’ll settle for compassion as replacement, and that was quite a beautiful surprise. Finally something I could give myself to without restraint, no longer standing in the queue waiting for something to happen. If we choose to express compassionately, it seems that we re-activate our own transcendence; that we reconnect with that “Force” from which we became engendered and alive, a part of the whole that makes us, as individuals, whole. A consciousness breakaway from the control lab called organized religion in particular, but the “evil trinity” of Religion, State and Money in general. From detachment to self empowerment to freedom of mind (thought process). Thanks for the push and the challenges, Jim.

              Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ll take that as a like? Thanks John. You’ve followed my journey out since the beginning. Your insights and links and posts of your own are very thought provoking. I’m very open to anything’s possible right now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A shouted LIKE, and that’s only because there is no LOVE option. I often drop the “You Want a Physicist to Speak at your Funeral,” but this now replaces that. It’s that good.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. We cannot find the meaning of our existence because we are the meaning of our existence. Through our lens the universe, us, views itself unknowing the vastness we call space, is we.

            That’s it. That. Is. It.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. It is it. I’m coming to grips with it. It is difficult for me to find the wording of these thoughts. How to explain it is the challenge.

              Liked by 1 person

            2. On another note, certain individuals have claimed ownership of these revelations and assigned their meanings to the cultural/traditional father figure of a god. Packaged it and claimed authority, but it’s an experience available to each person without the turn-key price of submission and endless tail chasing. This actually helps science, destroys religion as we know it, and empowers people. No wonder the founders (ego, greed) keep this hidden from common people.

              Liked by 1 person

            3. It does empower people. It gives them no option but to act. At uni I went to a lecture one night being given by some wandering speaker. It was pretty good, spiritual stuff that landed on the “we’re god” business. After the lecture, as we had drinks and mingled, a man went up to the speaker and said something like: “I liked what you said, but I think you missed something. Yes, we’re gods, but we’re gods with neighbours.”

              Liked by 1 person

  4. I was reading in Michael Pollan’s latest book about transcendent experiences, sometimes via meditation and others through hallucinogenic drugs. He seems to suggest that these experiences create unshakable spiritual belief (not religious), but the examples he gives seem to suggest that the experience is colored by prior perception/belief. It made me doubtful that there was any truly universal connection going on – though I’d love to think it is possible.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I do think there is a line between induced hallucinations and being in touch with the energy of our realities. Rawgod would disagree, but we see physics and the transcendent experience on a vector to merge. We are comprised mostly of open space containing vast amounts of energy equal to what we know as empty space. The calculations are eerily closer than our ability to measure it (which is very, very close thanks to CERN) within .000038. They’re very close to unlocking this mystery of consciousness, energy, and gravity and it appears to be all the same thing.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, there was definitely a contention the consciousness is not a product of the mind, but external to it. Don’t know what I think about that, yet. The universe will inform me, right?😉

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Fantastically written. Thomas Paine too, certainly has a way of setting things right. If only Christians could see things so clearly. The Bible is not a “good book” not is it productive or true at all. How is it can be believed as such is the real miracle. You’re right Mary, again.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jim…Did you ever read The Darkening Age ..How Christianity destroyed the Classical World by Catherine Nixey?
        You would love it!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Very good Jim. I red all sorts of books on various topics in my almost 72 years of this life. Many were on various beliefs/religions. Why? Curiosity. Yeah ‘they’ say it killed the cat, but Sherie told me that satisfaction bought it back, so there ya go. Plus, I was and still interested in all sorts of things even different religious beliefs, mostly due to said curiosity. Same with good science fiction and real history, or good historical fiction. Wide variety of reading. Same with music, good classical music, not very keen on opera, big band music, Dixie land bands, and of course 60’s to late 70’s rock & roll (now called classic rock).
    Did my best to enjoy this life because worrying is a waste of time, see my “Why Worry” comment a few posts here back.
    I don’t need any supernatural, the real natural holds enough neat things to last nme at least 25 life times.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Walter. I love classical music as well as many others. In this life turned specialist, the mono disciplines required to make a living really shortchange our opportunity for variety in so many ways.

      Like

  6. I am starting to believe in the supernatural, but in the British use of the word “super.” The supernatural is just reality of the best kind. This way everyone can have everything they want. Denizens of the Kingdom of Woo can life side-by-side with flat earth creationists. Wouldn’t that be lovely?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Flat earth—just because they’re crazy, doesn’t make it true. Spheres are round last I checked. But the universe is a crazy and energy filled wonder of wonder. We fail to separate ourselves from it because we are it.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s