Reasoning With Resonance

How reason tells us there is only life

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Spending a lot of time and years searching for meaning, wondering, worrying, sometimes hoping life lasts and lasts, while other times wishing it was over, takes up a lot of our thought-time here in the earthly—don’t let life pass you by searching for meaning over having experience You won’t find it. You are it.

We certainly can be entertained by the search. The philosophy is quite good to hear and read, but where does it go? What good is knowing your future or understanding past, your hopes shifted here and there by a little dose of some neat words?

Tomorrow is as uncertain as the past (what we can remember of it) and was a state of mind that’s no longer me, but will be accountable for in the Christian hereafter. Maybe I’ll get Alzheimer’s and forget the wrongs I’ve done before I go to die, what then? Is there a dividing line?

We can’t see the supernatural because we are the supernatural. We are a ripple in the extension of galaxies, an antennae, a presence of convergence in the fabric of space and energy. When we meditate and perceive what seems to be another world, are merely glimpses into our past and timeless future. Like a fish seeing the water and being in awe, we too cannot perceive the baseline of our existence which is space (we are made of it) which is life itself.

We. Are. It. We are not I as we typically think of. We cannot find the meaning of our existence because we are the meaning of our existence. Through our lens the universe, us, views itself unknowing the vastness we call space, is we. It is so obvious we cannot imagine life with it or without it.

Abandon the father figure of god that is so ingrained in our western culture, for “god” is merely a co-op, a dispensary of source energy, consciousness, that very concept that eludes us is indeed the mystery. We could not know the darkness without the light, nor peace without the turmoil, heaven without the hell. We exist unable to comprehend our opposite because “I am that I am”.

We cannot imagine what life was like before we were born. Nor can we accept that death is the total end, and at that moment would be as though we never were. To posit an end means we had a beginning. We cannot envision a beginning or an end—we are incapable of it because we always have been.

Where We Go From Here

If this life were part of a series of reincarnated experiences, why would it matter at all in mankind’s search for purpose if we can’t remember them from one existence to the next? Where does it all go when you’re dead and buried? In the next 85-90 years another entirely new crop of humans will populate the earth, while nearly 8 billion purported “meanings” and “purposes” of life are lucky to be remembered after 1 generation.

From my former religiously stained fingers—death is the great escape into peace. Not by living again, but by offering exactly the same “freedom from care” that we experienced before we were born. What was lost—peace, is once again found only to be unknown—again.

We have risen to life, now against the odds of inevitable aging and death we hope to carry on, realizing some form or potential. Would we settle to be a meadow of wild grass or a meandering brook, only to prolong any semblance of physical experience? All this searching for meaning over a brief flicker from past lives feign to recall (or sleep paralysis) or merely an active, imaginative brain inventing?

The desire to live forever is a notion implanted—a wishful potential of an ideal—yet death will reunite us to our past”.

Certainly there are things I enjoy now—things that I would miss, while others disdain—if I were aware to see it.

Such is the audacity of man, that he hath learned to counterfeit nature, yea, and is so bold as to challenge her in her work”—Pliny the Elder

All of these experiences seem a little futile if you can’t remember them when in the physical realms where they are useful to us. If reincarnation were real, what good is finding out purpose in this life if we don’t remember it coming or going?

Is it so hard to live in the present? Are we just hamster-wheeling for nought?

The crooked trail into our wilderness.

Interesting mushroom

Fear Play—

How we trade in our insecurities for bigger ones

A healthy amount of fear is normal. Skepticism allows us to make our way in the world without being suckered, while religion attempts to alleviate those fears, then ersatz the trivial everyday with existential death anxiety—not terribly afraid to die, but afraid of what will happen after you do—and a fear of separating from loved ones you never knew before life happened.

On advisement we relax and let Jesus take the wheel, then fear is directed at our performance and we’ve taken the bait. We all have fears—which ones, seem to make all the difference finding personal peace.

Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom“—Luke 12:23 KJV

Have I got a deal for you! Do you want to see my puppy? I have ice cream—any flavor you want—like the taste of hell… Even as a believer this made me a little squirmy, but few seem to be able resist it.

I was having a conversation the other day and the gentleman said, “we get the most out of religion when we allow our faith to be vulnerable“—in a sense, letting down your guard in belief.

Allowing your faith to be vulnerable is like lowering your expectations to be happier. After all, getting a C- when you were expecting a D can give a lot of hope, but it doesn’t take us anywhere meaningful. I know, I grew up being suckered.

So how does one go about deciding the right amount of vulnerability? It can be comforting to be a part of a flock full of deception you can trust—until you no longer think like they do.

Christianity—Holding on to the past while hoping the future ends—until it’s their future.

Why should I fear death?
If I am, then death is not.
If Death is, then I am not.
Why should I fear that which can only exist when I do not?”

Epicurus, letter to Menoeceus

The Old Ways—What We Have Done

Assimilation is nearly complete. Welcome to the monochromatic world you bastards.

Indigenous tribes are continuing to disappear from the landscape. The old ways are dying off. The elders, all preparing to take their final breaths, taking the languages, cultures, and knowledge of the last remaining various groups to be gone in a generation. Virtually no more children are learning the native language of their fathers—essentially it is dead already. Every two weeks another heritage goes extinct as the last elder dies. What’s left is a monochromatic disaster of the big five religions. Variety is dead. Long live Christianity—Disgusting.

Assimilation is nearly complete. 150,000 years of tradition, language, knowledge, beliefs, shaman—gone in 300 years of western industrialists. People that lived amazing lives, literally in tune with Mother Earth in a way few can comprehend. Please, please take a moment to watch Nat Geo’s ethnographer Wade Davis show you what we have done in the name of monotheism and industrialism. What we have destroyed. How can anyone want this?—EnterReligion

There is a text version included with the TED if you prefer, Nan.

Clinically Dead vs Biologically Dead

Clinical death occurs when the heart stops beating and the blood stops flowing. Clinical death precedes biological death by 4-6 minutes, whereas clinical death is reversible with intervention, but biological death is not.

Since religion is always the opposite of what we hear, so it is with its death. Christianity is biologically brain dead, but it’s members are pumping on the chest of the corpse and counting compressions as heart beats while claiming a code save. Not sure if you’ve ever done CPR, but it takes a lot of energy, resources and strength to keep a clinically dead person from slipping off into biologically dead. It’s a tiresome process that requires you pass off to other rescuers to keep compressions efficient.

Ceasing resuscitation efforts is difficult at times. Family and friends often urge you to keep trying, go one more round on the algorithms to get a shockable rhythm for a chance of spontaneous heart beat and respiration. At some point you have to call it off. Religion has been in asystole for quite some time, but the members are too attached and too full of need to recognize their beating a dead horse—one that is biologically and clinically dead. It’s time to lay this one to rest.

How Pretending is a Bigger Problem

Hush tones and inside jokes, comments like “I’m not racist but”, “hey look at that”, and pass judgement on people you have no idea about their history or what type of person they are. Saw it all the time in the faith. This is their way of life. One must be good with the lord watching you, surveying us 24 hours a day, even in our sleep, and even the hushed tones are not exempt from the ears of the lord. Below is a terrific quote. Some of this is new to me, so forgive me if this is old news.

“Some people I know who are atheists will say they wish they could believe it. Some people I know who are former believers say they wish they could have their old faith back; they miss it. I don’t understand this at all. I think it’s an excellent thing that there’s no reason to believe in the absurd propositions I admittedly, rather briefly, rehearsed to you.

The main reason for this, I think, is that it is a totalitarian belief. It is the wish to be a slave. It is the desire that there be an unalterable, unchallengeable tyrannical authority, who can convict you of thought crime while you are asleep. Who can subject you — who MUST indeed subject you — to a total surveillance, around the clock, every waking and sleeping minute of your life — I say of your life; before you’re born, and even worse (and where the real fun begins), after you’re dead. A celestial North Korea. Who wants this to be true? Who but a slave desires such a ghastly fate?

I’ve been to North Korea. It has a dead man as its president. Kim Jong-il is only the head of the party and head of the army; he’s not head of the government or the state. That office belongs to his deceased father, Kim Il-sung. It’s a necrocracy, a thanatocracy — it’s one short of the Trinity, I might add. The son is the reincarnation of the father. It is the most revolting, and utter, and absolute, and heartless tyranny the human species has ever evolved.

But at LEAST you can fucking DIE and leave North Korea. Does the Qur’an or the Bible offer you that liberty? No! No, the tyranny, the misery, the utter ownership of your entire personality, the smashing of your individuality, only begins at the point of death. This is evil; this is a wicked preachment.” – Christopher Hitchens

So they continue. They present a pious side while secretly living as you or I might, but the constant life of deception carries over into laws, and schools, and the solid footing of Christianity is all built on hiding the true self. PRETENDING. Never show the real you, and it is a habit of deception and farce because they are being watched. Dress the part, play the part, speak softly and hide your pious racism, but keep touting that you and the faith are well.