Initiation Mythology—A Rite of Passage

How Christianity is now a barrier to human development.

Abrahamic mythology has raised a barrier to western progress and thought the past two thousand years. It’s a truly despicable way to think about things—convincing much of the world that they are unworthy, incapable, and merely orphans created out of nothing with no mother, and no true father either—but by adoption we can be tolerated (for how long nobody knows (insert platitudes* here) but god, who can do nothing wrong in his wrongs.

It is only by grace we are allowed to slog around as incompetent creations of clay, owing our very existence to the father who created us. We deserve to be punished at any and every moment, and the only reason it hasn’t happened yet is the kings guess. He has but one son who is the object of his affection, while the rest of us grovel prostrated in front before him—born guilty and on constant probation with his watchful eye never resting it’s intrusive gaze.

That barrier requires us to crawl to it, to obey ourselves into gods good grace. We owe him everything, primarily because he created us out of nothing, and without him we may not exist at all. You owe him and are forever in debt, and are to thank and praise him no matter how dismal the circumstance.

The test is not to believe and submit as they have us believe, that is done most automatically, deceived from birth to death—we are all under the rule of the collective minds that go nowhere as a people but round—forever postulating and dissipating our spent energies back into the cosmos. The test is to not only not believe it, but also to transcend its limitations—it’s influence, and become a contributor. The first step is unbelief. There is an entirely positive way of seeing the world and humanity, but we have to earn our independence because we deserve it, not because it’s been handed to us.

Paul, if anything, was as a guru placing a test—a barrier in front of the people as a rite of passage. Presenting a circuitous, seemingly unsolvable conundrum before humanity as a means of control until they are ready for the next level.

*platitude/ pladəˌt(y)o͞od/ a remark or statement, especially one with a moral content, that has been used too often to be interesting or thoughtful.—Enter religion

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