Ruminating on Belief—

How long until humanity can transcend beyond belief mode?

Belief holds only a temporary benefit until a premise has been proven, not a goal in itself—when do we move on?

Understanding your human nature is an important key to resisting the patterns that sustain anchoring bias—that deep tendency to adhere to the first information acquired on any given subject. Ruminating that first morsel—a lifetime of informational cud chewing. How hard is it to change what you’ve been taught in ignorance of the subject, then believed? It takes a miracle, but let’s face it, in those first moments of exposure we’re all ignorant—and gullible to the authority, whether it be parents, professors, or pastors.

Then comes the backfire effect, a near universal, automatic reaction to repudiating evidence of your mere faith, which strengthens your beliefs in spite of better solutions—digging in, protecting those little nuggets wrapped up in your skull when new ideas or evidence is counter to what you believe. Norepinephrine is released in the brain when facts are presented counter to what we believe, creating a fight or flight (or stubbornness) to adopt new information. Religions grow from this stubbornness of human hormones and hardwiring.

Take Darwin for example; He himself was attuned to this phenomenon and lamented his discovery, struggling to procede openly with the Origin of Species because of the effect it would have on everything and everyone he knew—very aware that the reception his evidence would bring a fight.

No matter the spiritual belief, people take great comfort in what they already understand—even if it is a garbled mess to everyone else. Replaying their same old themes—reruns that are familiar and predictable. In today’s world we have to adapt quickly to keep up with technology, processes, and the devices. But belief is a special carrot, hampering progress with archaic, inerrant faith—the comfort zone, the one tool of the devil that keeps you enslaved to your biggest weakness—that overburdened ability to believe what you are initially told, even when it’s obvious it isn’t true.

Just believe. Convincing your mental self by answering your own prayers (you know that talking to yourself thing where you reason away your own mind) and making excuses for the writers inadequacies and failed promises.

Give up and let god? That is the literal example of human damnation—Abrahamic religions ability to stop the flow of actual growth and progress through mandated belief (then we defend it out of hormonal response).

Our perceptions are much more faulty than accurate. It’s no wonder the majority of the world believes something that can’t be seen, measured, or heard—craving that super hero to comfort their struggles—simply because they were told one exists and we are obligated to say yes to a fault.

Faith is pretending not to trust your poor judgement—which is using your own poor judgement to allow someone else to chose your path for you. Understanding your physiology is the key to moving on.

Which Religion is The True Religion

How heuristic efforts can undo the faith that killed reason.

Guessing which religion is true depends mostly on where you were born, or the one that caught you vulnerable during a crisis. If you were born to a specific faith, that is most likely the One True Church™️—makes perfect sense. With all the options available that certainly makes it a bit easier.

The three lines below represent three major world religions. The religion that represents the line in the center is yours, which initially appears conveniently as the obvious, longest center line in the group.

This is the Müller-Lyer Illusion. If you look closely the center shafts are all the same length, as illustrated below. But appearance is everything in religion. Escaping your pre-conceived (literally in many cases) religion is fighting the odds against honest reason and logic that seems at times an insurmountable challenge against the array of bias research. Heuristics can help with a cognitive hands-on approach. We can train ourselves to be less knee jerk intuitive (belief) and more discerning, or analytical, at the very least, more cautious.

Research shows intuitive people are more likely to believe in god, while reflective, or analytical thinkers are more likely to be atheist. Here is a quick test with answers to see where you fall.

If you got some wrong, no worries. A lifetime of faith can disrupt your natural tendencies (feelings) Many of us spent a lifetime overlooking the obvious acquiescing to faith—and through faith you can know hand-wave the truth of all things.

Monotheistic religions may all appear different, but in reality they all produce the equal ability to embrace contradiction through faith, playing on bias and quirks of herd psychology. It’s so obvious even an atheist can see it. Read More HERE